McCOOK REPUBLICAN NEWS 1912

WEDDINGS:

Nichols-Lewis-Thursday morning, January 11, 1912, Miss Charlotte Nichols, who has been a stenographer in W.S. Morlan’s law offices for several years, and William W. Lewis, a machinist in the employ of the Burlington here, were married at the Methodist parsonage, Rev. Lewis officiating. The young couple left last evening for Omaha to visit for a few days and will be at home to their friends the latter part of next week in this city. The Republican joins their many friends in best wishes for a long and happy life to them. Friday 12 January 1912

Bush-Green-Monday, January 6, 1912, Miss Hattie B. Bush, of Cambridge, and Roy C. Green were married by County Judge Colfer, and immediately went to house keeping in rooms over the Pastime Theatre Wednesday evening their friends gave them a miscellaneous shower at the home of Mrs. M.H. Griggs in West McCook and received many presents. The best wishes of a host of friends are extended to the happy couple. Friday 12 January 1912

Schlect-Moore-Wednesday evening, January 17, 1912, Miss Barbara Schlect and Fred T. Moore were united in marriage at the Methodist parsonage, Rev. L.E. Lewis officiating in the presence of a few relatives. The bride and groom are well known here, where the bride has lived all her life. The groom was formerly proprietor of the White House grocery and continued as clerk when he sold out. Their many friends, whom The Republican joins, wish them a long and happy life. Friday 19 January 1912

Suska-Nelms-Tuesday, December 26, 1911, Miss Louise Suska and J. Calvin Nelms were married in Seward, Nebraska. The young couple arrived here last Saturday night. The groom is employed in the yardmaster’s office here and is well known to all the younger set. The bride was formerly employed in this city. The young couple have the best wishes of their many friends for a long and happy married life. Friday 2 February 1912

Miss Effie Powell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Marion Powell of Marion, Neb., formerly of Lincoln and Arthur H. Edgren of this city will be married Friday evening at 8:30 at the home of the bride’s sister, Mrs. Harold W. Wood, 149 South twenty-ninth street. Only relatives will be present. After a trip to Denver the couple will be at home at 2045 Pepper avenue, in a new home built by the groom. Mr. Edgren is a son of the late Dean Edgren and Mrs. Edgren.-Sunday’s Journal. Mr. and Mrs. Powell moved from Indianola to Lincoln while Miss Effie was a child, and have but lately moved to their ranch at Marion, in this county. Friday 9 February 1912

Married-At the Congregational church, Wednesday, February 7th, 1912, by Rev. H.W.W. Allen, Miss Bessie Simonsen and Mr. Albert Volbracht. The groom is the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Chris Volbracht of Healey, Kansas and is a young man of exemplary habits and his friends are limited only by his acquaintance. The bride is an accomplished daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Simonsen some few miles south of town. The News joins their many friends in extending congratulations. Friday 16 February 1912

Franklin-Pringle-A quiet and pleasant wedding occurred at the home of Mr. and Mrs. V. Franklin on Wednesday evening their daughter, Vernice and George Pringle of Parks being married at seven o’clock on that evening, the nuptials being celebrated by D.L. McBride, Pastor of the Baptist church. The wedding was a quiet one only the immediate relatives and a few guests being invited. Miss Vernice has grown up in McCook and is one of our most accomplished young ladies. Mr. Pringle is a prosperous ranchman at Parks and an accomplished gentleman. Mrs. W.B. Mills presided at the piano. After the ceremony a bountiful and excellent dinner was served. The bride and groom were the recipients of many valuable and useful gifts. The best wishes of everyone is extended to the happy couple for a long and happy life. Friday 16 February 1912

 

 

Daugherty-Jandebeur-Last Friday evening at 8 o’clock occurred the marriage of Miss Mattie Daugherty of our city and Mr. Harry A. Jandebeur of Stockton, Cal., Rev. Wm. Patton of St. Patrick’s church officiating, Elizabeth Daugherty acting as bridesmaid and John Murray as best man. The bride is the attractive daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E.C. Daugherty and has been a successful teacher in the county for the past five years having recently resigned her position in the McCook Public schools. She is the eldest grand child of grandpa and grandma McAdams. The groom was formerly employed as operator for the Burlington in this city, but he is now working for the Southern Pacific at Stockton, Cal. His many friends in McCook will remember him as an industrious young man. Mr. and Mrs. Jandebeur left on No. 14 the same evening for the eastern part of the state to visit with his parents and relatives a couple of weeks before going to California, their future home. The marriage took place on the 25th anniversary of the bride’s parents which also took place in this city. Friday 16 February 1912

Mitchell-Wheeler-Wednesday afternoon February 21, 1912, Miss Pearl A. Mitchell and Harry D. Wheeler were married at the Baptist parsonage, Rev. D.L. McBride officiating, Frank Amen acting as best man and Miss Elizabeth Miller as bridesmaid. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Russ Mitchell, of West McCook and has lived here all her life. The groom is cook in the City Restaurant and a steady reliable young man. The young couple have the best wishes of a host of friends for a long and happy life. Friday 23 February 1912

Bede-Ohlson-Wednesday afternoon Mable E. Bede and Benjamin E. Ohlson, both of Bartley, were united in marriage by Rev. L.E. Lewis at the Methodist parsonage. They returned to Bartley that evening and will make their home on a farm five miles north of that town. Friday 22 March 1912

 

Shoemaker-Burbridge-Last Sunday March 31, 1912, Miss Clarice M. Shoemaker of Alma, and Frank E. Burbridge, of this city, were married at the home of the bride’s parents, in Alma, Rev. Mr. Beebe, officiating. The bride is a stranger to most of the people here, but is one of the popular young ladies of her home town. The groom has lived and worked here as a barber for the past ten years and is now proprietor of one of the neatest and most prosperous barber shops in this city. The congratulations and best wishes of a host of friends, with whom The Republican heartily joins, are extended to the happy couple. Friday 5 April 1912

Cathcart-Brooks-A quiet wedding took place at the home of the bride’s sister, Mrs. Will Cassell, Saturday morning at 9:30 o’clock when Miss Irene Cathcart was united in marriage to H. Guy Brooks, Rev. L.E. Lewis, officiating. The bride had just finished a successful term of school in this county and is one of the popular young ladies who has a wide acquaintance in this part of the state. The groom is a son of Conductor Brooks and is employed as a passenger brakeman on the Burlington. The happy couple went to Denver that day on a wedding trip and will make their home in this city. They have the best wishes of all their friends, with whom The Republican joins, for a long and happy life. Friday 26 April 1912

Earl Decker of this place, and Miss Hattie Playford, of Harlan Tp., were married in Oberlin, Wednesday, April 24, 1912. They will occupy one of the Powell & Nilsson tenant houses while Earl works on the ranch. Friday 3 May 1912

The home of Mr. and Mrs. J.T. Delong, five miles southeast of Norman, Okla., was the scene of a happy event witnessed by a company of relatives and neighbors who were the invited guests at the marriage of their daughter, Miss Alice Delong of Norman to Walter Van Vleet of Danbury, Neb. which occurred at 12 o’clock, Thursday, April 25, 1912. Friday 10 May 1912

 

Allen-Strunk-Tuesday evening, June 4, 1912, Miss Arlene L. Allen and Harry D. Strunk were married at the residence of the bride’s mother, Mrs. Stella Allen, in the presence of members of the families of the contracting parties, Rev. R.T. Bayne officiating. Both young people are well known to many here and have the best wishes for a happy future of all their friends with whom The Republican joins in congratulations. The young couple have gone to house keeping on Second street East. Friday 7 June 1912

Wedding Reception-Tuesday evening Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bosworth gave a wedding reception at their home on Main Avenue to their son, Ralph and his bride, who were married in Denver June 6, and came here Friday evening to visit with the groom’s parents. The guests were met at the door by Mesdames J.A. and R.J. Gunn and directed up stairs where their wraps were cared for. Mrs. A. McMillen here had charge of the guest’s book and each wrote their name in it. The guests were then served punch at a very pretty bower decorated with red and white roses and presided over by the Misses Leah Pennell and Hazel Merle. In the living room which was decorated with large bouquets of roses and one of orange blossoms the host hostess and the bride and groom stood in line to receive their guests who were introduced to the bride. The guests were then ushered into the dining room which was decorated with bouquets of pink carnations and the guests were served with a two course luncheon, Mesdames Maud Stokes and Nina Kleven serving the coffee, cake and ice cream, assisted by Mrs. Charles Knowles, Misses Edna Waite and Elizabeth Duncan. The young couple received many beautiful and useful gifts of silver, cut glass, linen and many other things that will go to make their home pretty and comfortable. The out of town guests were: Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Holliday; Mrs. C.E. Pope and Miss Elizabeth Duncan of Denver; Mrs. J.A. Gunn of Des Moines, Iowa, and Miss Hazel Merle of Omaha. The reception was a most delightful one and the bride won the admiration of every one and she was given a most hearty welcome here. Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Bosworth will remain here for several weeks to rest having just graduated from a medical college as a physician and he will then look up a location. Friday 14 June 1912

Mein-Sullivan-Miss Anna Mein, who visited here with her aunt, Mrs. Lichtenberger, much of the time the past year, and made many friends during that time in this city was married June 6th to G.E. Sullivan, at her home in Ft. Dodge, Iowa. The best wishes of her friends here are extended to her. Friday 14 June 1912

Fitzgerald-Brady-Wednesday morning at 6:30 a.m. in St. Patrick’s church, Miss Mary E. Fitzgerald and Edward J. Brady were joined in marriage, Father Patton officiating. Miss Irene Holland, of Lincoln, was the maid of honor and Frank Brady, brother of the groom the best man. Mr. and Mrs. Buck played for the service, which was very beautiful. After the ceremony a three course wedding breakfast was served. The groom has always lived in this vicinity and is a young man of irreproachable character and of many excellent qualities. He has been a clerk in the post office for several years and is highly esteemed by all who know him. The bride has made her home here permanently since the starting of the McCook National Bank by her uncle, P. Walsh, employed in it as stenographer and bookkeeper. She was formerly in the office of the clerk of the supreme court in Lincoln and has won the esteem of every one with whom she has met here. The excellent young couple start out with the best wishes of everyone for a happy and prosperous life. They go to housekeeping at once in rooms until the home in course of construction by the groom is completed. Friday 14 June 1912

Cox-Woolard-Wednesday morning at 11 o’clock Miss Hazel M. Cox and Harry H. Woolard were quietly married at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. H.J. Cox, 502 3d Street East, Rev. A.R. Goldsmith, rector of the Episcopal church, officiating, in the presence of the family only. After a wedding dinner the couple left on No. 1 for Wray, Colorado to visit the bride’s sister, and will return the first of next week. They will be at home to their friends after July lst, at 318 Main Avenue. Both young people are well and favorably known to almost everyone here and to many in this part of the state. The groom has been a clerk in the post office for several years and is one of the most genial and popular young men of the city. The bride has been employed in the ladies ready to wear and millinery departments of DeGroff and Co.’s store of late, and is a very estimable young lady. The young couple have the best wishes of everyone who know them for a successful and happy future. Friday 14 June 1912

Morrison-Finity-Thursday evening June 13, 1912, Miss Ellen Morrison and Howard M. Finity were quietly married at the Baptist parsonage, by Rev. D.L. McBride, in the presence of a few relatives. The bride has been employed in Hornback’s restaurant and bakery. The groom has lived here many years and is in the employ of the Burlington as an inspector on the repair tracks. The best wishes of their many friends is extended to them. Friday 21 June 1912

Lunn-O’Connell-Frank T. O’Connell, of this city and Miss Myrtle Lunn of Dickson, Tennessee, were married at the home of the bride’s parents June 12, 1912, and arrived here Friday. The groom has lived here all his life and is popular with all who know him. His beautiful bride has been given a hearty welcome and The Republican with his many other friends join in congratulations and best wishes to the happy couple for a long, and prosperous life. The following account of the wedding is taken from the Dickson Home Enterprise: At the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Lunn, in South Dickson, Wednesday night at 8:30 o’clock, their youngest daughter, Miss Myrtle Lunn, was united in holy wedlock to Mr. Frank T. O’Connell of McCook, Nebraska, Rev. Terry Martin, this city, in his inimitable and impressive style pronouncing the marriage ceremony. The Lunn home was appropriately decorated for the occasion. Quite a number of relatives of the bride and several close friends witnessed the culmination of the happy event. This marriage, though a quiet home affair, was a prominent one in Dickson’s social circles due to the popularity of Miss Lunn who was a distinct social favorite with all who knew her, and was classed as one among Dickson’s most lovable, attractive and cultured young women. Mr. O’Connell, who by birth, is a native Nebraskan is a most pleasant, affable young man, and is a descendant of one of the best families of his section . For the past seven years he has steadily been in the employment of the C.B. & Q. railway with headquarters at McCook, as an expert machinist at a lucrative salary. After the marriage ceremony and rounds of congratulations and good wishes were showered upon the happy young couple, they, accompanied by a host of friends went to the railway depot, where in the midst of a veritable shower of rice boarded the 9:20 west bound passenger train enroute to the groom’s home where they will spend a few days, and from there will continue their bridal trip to Denver, Colorado, and other points. Friday 21 June 1912

Married-Everett Olmstead and Miss Atwood of Oregon, were married last Saturday evening June 15, 112. Mr. Olmstead has just returned from a year’s trip to Argentina, S.A. Mrs. and Mrs. Olmstead will make their home in Nebraska. Friday 5 July 1912

Quietly Married-Miss Gertrude Morrissey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Morrissey, and Mr. Ralph Rozell, of the firm of W.M. Rozell & Son, the clothiers, two popular young society people of this city, went to Trenton Wednesday afternoon and were quietly married. They have the best wishes of their numerous friends. Friday 5 July 1912

Armstrong-DeLong-Last Thursday evening Miss Jessie Armstrong and Mr. Jesse DeLong were united in marriage at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. C.H. Husted, Rev. D.L. McBride, pastor of the Baptist church, officiating. The bride is a very estimable young lady with a wide acquaintance, having clerked in the Bon Ion and the deal Store for the past several years. The groom is proprietor of the City Pantutorium. The best wishes of their many friends with whom The Republican joins is extended to the happy couple. Friday 19 July 1912

 

 

 

Hegenberger-Korf-Sunday afternoon, July 21, 1912, at 4:30 o’clock Miss Mabel E. Hegenberger and Lester J. Korf were married at the Methodist parsonage, Rev. L.E. Lewis officiating. The bride is the youngest daughter of Conductor and Mrs. Joseph Hegenberger, she has always lived here and graduated from the high school two years ago; she is popular in the younger society. The groom is employed in DeGroff & Co.’s general store and a worthy young man and the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. J.H. Korf. The young people have the best wishes of everyone for a happy future. Friday 26 July 1912

Clarence A. Lawrence and Dorothy Hann, both of Wauneta, were married at the Methodist parsonage by Rev. L.E. Lewis, Friday evening, July 19, 1912, at 8 o’clock. The bride is a daughter of Editor J.W. Hann, of the Wauneta Breeze, and in consequence The Republican extends to the young couple its best wishes for a happy and prosperous future. Friday 26 July 1912

Miss Edith Lyon, sister of Will Rav and Herv Lyon and known to many of the young people here was married to A.R. Smith at her home near Trenton Sunday. Friday 26 July 1912

Kukney-Wiehe-Miss Maude Kukney and William E. Wiehe were married Saturday August 24, 1912, in Lincoln. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John P. Kukney, of Havelock, and the groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. A.C. Wiehe, of this city. Will has been working in the Havelock shoes of the Burlington the past few months, and his marriage was a surprise to his many friends in this city. The Republican wishes the young couple a long, happy future. Friday 30 August 1912

Miss Nettie Williams and Earl Castor were united in marriage by Justice Redman Tuesday afternoon. The bride is a daughter of Wm. Williams and the groom a son of Perry Castor, all living southeast of town. The young couple are well and favorably known in this vicinity. Friday 13 September 1912

Miss Louise Grant Dulaney, of this city and Orville Day of Seattle, Washington, were married in Grand Island, last Thursday by Judge Mullin. They will make their home in Grand Island for the present. Their many friends join in extending congratulations. Friday 13 September 1912

Huet-Wyatt-Wednesday afternoon September 18, 1912, at three o’clock, Miss Ollie P. Huet and Judson Wyatt were married at the home of the bride, east of this city, Rev. L.E. Lewis officiating. The best wishes of the happy couple’s many friends are extended to them. Friday 20 September 1912

Amann-Witters-Monday evening, September 23, at the home of W.H. Radcliffe on Fourth Street West, occurred the marriage of Frank B. Amann, of this city, and Dora Witters of Minden, Nebraska. Rev. L.E. Lewis, officiating. Mr. Amann has made his home here being in the employ of the Burlington, and is well known and liked. His bride comes from Minden, and though a stranger to many is welcomed to her new home. The Republican joins with their many friends in wishing them a long and prosperous wedded life. Friday 27 September 1912

Married in Trenton-The following license was issued by John M. Williams, county judge, October 3rd. Earl H. Green and Miss Clara Kautz, McCook, Nebraska. The couple arrived on No. 15 and departed on No. 16. They aroused the judge from his peaceful slumber and were married at 2:30 a.m. Trenton Leader Friday 11 October 1912

Russell-Nelms-Sunday afternoon, October 20, 1912, Miss Edna Russell and Mr. J.E. Nelms, Jr., were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s sister, Mrs. C.C. Brown. Rev. D.L. McBride performed the ceremony in the presence of only a few immediate friends and relatives. Following the marriage an elaborate wedding dinner was served. Mrs. J.E. Nelms, Sr. and Mrs. Cal Nelms assisting Mrs. Brown in the serving. The bride was gowned in cream messaline satin and carried a large bouquet of white and yellow chrysanthemums. The groom wore conventional black. The young couple were the recipients of many presents including considerable silverware. They have gone to housekeeping on 5th Street East where their newly furnished rooms were in waiting, and will be at home to their many friends after November 15. Friday 25 October 1912

Ball-Fitch-The nuptials of William Carroll Fitch and Miss Hazel Ball were celebrated at the bride’s home three miles north of this city on Tuesday evening, October 22, D.L. McBride officiating, assisted by Rev. Neil Johnson of the Methodist church. A bit of sentiment prevaded the event because of the fact that the officiating minister also married the parents of the bride. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Ball at the home of Mr. and Mrs. T.B. Campbell in McCook twenty years ago. The wedding on Tuesday night was a very happy affair. The sixty guests present all participated joyfully in the occasion. Among those present were the following from out of town: Mrs. Mary Jenkins and Mrs. Henry Shoebotham of Fairbury, Neb., Mrs. Herman and Mrs. Andrew Anderson of California; Mrs. T.B. Campbelll of Minden and Mrs. C.B. Hoag of Indianola. The music and refreshments were splendid and greatly enjoyed and the chavarie party from town was quite up to date in performance. The presents were numerous, useful and many of them costly, among which were a chest of valuable silver, gift of Mrs. T.B. Campbell and daughters, a quilt from an aunt of the bride which had been presented the aunt at her wedding thirty-five years ago, beside silver knives, forks, spoons, trava, etc, cut glass articles and a large collection of linen fabrics, among which was a very handsome centerpiece knitted by the groom’s mother. Both of these young people were born and raised in this community and are considered among its most estimable members. They will go to housekeeping and make their home on the groom’s father’s farm southwest of the city, accompanied by the best wishes of a large circle of friends. Friday 25 October 1912

Hoff-Baker-Saturday afternoon, October 25, 1912, Miss Mary Hoff and Adam Baker were united in marriage, Rev. Mr. Wagner of the German Congregational church officiating. A wedding dinner was served after the ceremony at the home of the bride’s parents, and the young couple were the recipients of many presents. They left that evening for Lincoln on a wedding trip accompanied by Miss Marie Krieger and Mr. E. Sinner. The happy young couple have the best wishes of many friends to a long and happy life. Friday 1 November 1912

Brown-Heldman-Sunday afternoon, November 3, 1912, Miss Minnie Brown and Mr. Branch Heldman were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s brother, J.C. Brown, on Sixth street East, Judge F.M. Colfer officiating. The bride is an estimable young lady who has been making her home with her brother here lately, and the groom has been employed as a barber here for some time, and has a large number of friends, all of whom join The Republican in wishing the happy couple a long and happy life. Friday 8 November 1912

Ford-Morey-A quiet wedding occurred at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ella Ford Tuesday evening, when their daughter, Edith Mirrian, became the bride of Mr. Edward E. Morey, of Chadron, Nebraska. Promptly at 5 o’clock, Miss Eunice Ford took her place at the piano, and while she played the wedding march the bridal couple took their places under an arch of smilax, and were met by Rev. A.A. Robertson who performed the ceremony using the impressive ring service. The bride was gowned in a neat fitting tailored suit of white whincord carried a bouquet of bride’s roses. The groom were a becoming business suit. After the ceremony the guests partook of a bountiful turkey dinner. The bride is the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ellis Ford and was born and brought up in this city where she has a large circle of friends. The groom is a prominent young business man of Chadron, Nebraska. The young couple received many beautiful and useful presents of cut glass, china, silverware, linen, rugs, pictures, and other useful articles. There ceremony was witnessed just by the immediate relatives and a few friends but was followed in the evening by a largely attended reception. After the reception the bride and groom left for their future home in Chadron. Friday 29 November 1912

Mitchell-Wheeler-Thursday, November 28, 1912, at the home of the bride’s sister, Mrs. P.P. Weston, at Lincoln, Neb., Miss Pearl Mitchell and Mr. Sidney Wheeler were united in marriage, in the presence of a few relatives. They left at once on a short trip to Denver and other points in Colorado, leaving Colorado Monday for New Castle, Wyo. where they will make their future home. They passed through this city Monday night. Mr. Wheeler is employed as coal inspector at New Castle. This estimable young couple will be remembered by their many friends in this city who join The Republican in wishing them a long and happy married life. Friday 6 December 1912

Guy-Kimmell-Last Friday evening Miss Ruth A. Guy, of Arapahoe, and E. Schell Kimmell of this city, were married at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Guy in Arapahoe. The wedding was a quiet one, only the families of the contracting parties being present. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. F.M. Kimmell, of this city, and he has lived here all his life, at present he has charge of the Ellingson photograph gallery in Arapahoe. The Republican joins their friends in wishing the young couple a long, happy and prosperous life. Friday 13 December 1912

DEATHS:

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Dodd Wiggins died of pneumonia Monday night. Friday 12 January 1912

Obituary-Mrs. Mary Vogel was born September 27, 1840 at St. Louis, Missouri, and died January 5, 1912, aged 71 years, 3 months and 9 days. She was married to John Antony Vogel, M.D. October 12, 1859. Six children blessed this union, three girls and three boys. The husband and two girls have preceded her in death. Four children, forty-three grand children and nine great grandchildren are left to mourn her departure. The family came to Frontier county, June 17, 1887 and to Hayes county in 1890 and have resided there since. She was a kind mother and grandmother. She was a member of the Catholic church. Funeral services were held at the residence and St. Ann church and interment at St. Ann cemetery. The Republican joins the many friends and relatives in extending sympathy to the sons and daughter. Card of Thanks-We take this means of thanking our many friends and neighbors who so kindly assisted during the recent illness and burial of our beloved Mother, we give our heartfelt thanks. Joe Vogel, George Vogel and Mrs. B. Wichmann Friday 12 January 1912

Dies Suddenly-J.R. Jackson Dies From Heart Failure While Coming to Town Friday-Last Friday evening about five o’clock, J.R. Jackson was seen to fall while crossing the tracks in the railroad yards, and when those who saw him fall reached him he was dead. The company physician was telephoned for but on his arrival he gave us his opinion that death had been almost instantaneous. Mr. Jackson had brought his wife and his daughters, to Mrs. John W. Shirley’s home in a buggy earlier and drove the horse back to his home, about two miles south of town, and walked back to attend a birthday celebration of their son-in-law, Mr. Shirley. He was crossing the railroad company’s yards when he was suddenly stricken. His body was taken to Pade’s undertaking rooms, prepared for burial and then taken to the home of his daughter, Mrs. H.L. Lashbaugh. James Regon Jackson was born at London, Kentucky, January 28, 1836, died in McCook January 5, 1912. He was the second oldest of a family of eleven children and is survived by three brothers: W.J. of Maywood, Nebr., E.S. of Portland, Oregon, D.R. of Ft. Cobb, Oklahoma and two sisters; Mrs. D. Lawson, Ft. Cobb, and Mrs. Oregon Phoris of Denver. He went to Missouri with his parents in 1850 and was married to Miss Ruth E. Root in 1859, at Renton, to which union ten children were born, seven of whom with the mother survive him; two daughters, Mrs. J.W. Shirley and Mrs. H.L. Lashbaugh of this city, and five sons: J.H. of Maywood; C.W. and A.D. of Wellfleet; L.V. of Moore, Mont.; O.L. of Walnut, California, all of whom were present at the funeral except O.L. Jackson, of California, who arrived a few hours after the funeral. He moved to Frontier county Neb. in 1886 and seven years ago moved to near this city. He was a consistent member of the Baptist church since a young man and the funeral services were held in that church Wednesday afternoon, Rev. D.L. McBride officiating. The heartfelt sympathy of the community is extended to the afflicted family in their sorrow. Friday 12 January 1912

Francis Marion Pennington was born in Scotia county, Arkansas, February 26, 1845. Died at his home in Lebanon, Nebraska, January 20, 1912. He enlisted in Co. I, 11th Ills. Cav. April 1, 1864, and served until the close of the war. He returned and lived in Illinois three years then moved to Black Hawk county, where he married Miss Mary Francis Coon September 28, 1870, of this union two sons were born, Allen E., of this place, and Ira, of McCook, who, with their mother, survive him. Mr. Pennington and family moved to this county in 1879, settling on a homestead near Lebanon, which was their home for most of the time since coming here nearly thirty-three years ago. The funeral was held Monday at the Presbyterian church, Rev. D.L. McBride, pastor of the Baptist church at McCook, officiating. Interment was made in the Lebanon cemetery. Friday 2 February 1912

W.Y. Johnson Dies-William Y. Johnson who came here a short time ago sick and was taken to Omaha Sunday, January 31, died in the hospital there the following Friday, February 2, 1912. He was born in Coles county, Illinois, April 5, 1862. In 1879 he moved to Harlan County with his parents and came to this county in 1881, and lived near and in this city until about a year ago when he and his family moved to the San Louis Valley, Colorado. He was married to Miss Isabelle E. Hickling, December 31, 1886. Three sons and four daughters were born to them, who with their mother survive him. His remains were brought here Saturday and services were held at the residence of his sister, Mrs. George Shields, in West McCook, Sunday afternoon Rev. L.E. Lewis, officiating and his remains buried in Riverview cemetery. The deceased was widely known in this part of the state, and the bereaved family have the sympathy of many friends. Friday 9 February 1912

 

 

 

Peter Carty Dead-A telegram was received here yesterday morning by Mrs. Ray Higley who was formerly Birdie Carty, that her father, Peter Carty, had died in a hospital in California, following an operation. No details were given. Peter Carty went out to California about two months ago to visit his brother-in-law, Ed Farrell, and became very sick a short time ago and was taken to a hospital. His family had been notified and his daughter arrived here Wednesday night on her way to California and stayed over night with her aunt intending to go on the next morning, but received the sad news before train time. Pete Carty will be remembered by many of the older citizens. He was yard master here for the Burlington many years and moved over to the Beaver valley about eight years ago. The sympathy of all goes out to the stricken family. The body will be shipped back for burial here. Friday 16 February 1912

Mrs. Margaret Sentence was born in Plymouth, Ill., April 19, 1845. She was united in marriage to Mr. John Sentence 1875. To this union four children were born, three daughters and a son, all of whom survive her. Mrs. Sentence united with the Christian church at the age of 17 years and was a faithful Christian until her death, having been a member of the above church 49 yrs. She succumbed to pneumonia after three weeks of illness, at the McCoy hospital, Feb 4, 8:30 p.m., aged 66 years, 9 mo. 5 days. The funeral services were held from the Christian church, of this city, Tuesday morning at 10:00 a.m. and were conducted by Pastor G. R. Miller. Friday 16 February 1912

Edward Austin Ruby was born July 12, 1870 near Reinersville, Morgan Co., Ohio, died Febr. 10, 1912 at Falls City, Nebr. Aged 41 years, 6 months, and 28 days. He was the third child of Sarah E. and the late John Wesley Ruby. In 1887 he moved with his parents to a homestead just south of Danbury where they lived for a few years before moving to Danbury, which place has since been his home except for a few years when he lived at Marion and had charge of the DeMay Lumber Yard. He married Miss Edith Newberry Oct. 27, 1892, to which union seven daughters were born two of which have preceded him to the better land. Those surviving are Irene, Marie, Pearl, Wynona and Jenniveve, ranging in age from 17 years to the babe in arms. Friday 23 February 1912

Obituary-Martin L. Yarger, born in France, November 11, 1836. Died in McCook, Nebraska February 21, 1912. The deceased had been sick for about three months but was not considered seriously so until about a month ago when he became confined to his home. Mr. Yarger came to this country with his parents when 8 years old. He enlisted and served throughout the civil war. He came to Nebraska about thirty years ago and has lived in this city about twenty-five years. He was married to Miss Julia Edwards in 1893. He is survived by three sons, two stepsons and his widow, who have the sympathy of the community in their sorrow. The funeral services will be held from his late home in West McCook, this afternoon at two o’clock. Friday 23 February 1912

Obituary-Henry Crabtree was born February 5, 1833 in Licken County, Ohio. When but a boy his parents moved to Polk City, Iowa, and here when 15 years of age he united with the M.E. church. On July 7, 1859, he was married to Daphne A. Baker. To this union eleven children were born, eight of whom are still living. In the year 1861 he enlisted in the Union Army serving as First Sargent of the Twenty-third Iowa Infantry and receiving an honorable discharge at the close of the war. He came to Red Willow county, Nebraska, in the spring of 1879 and has been prominent as a citizen and official. He was respected by all classes. For a number of years he has been failing in health and died on March 2, 1912. Funeral services were held at the home on March 4, conducted by the pastor C.A. Norlin. The burial service was in charge of the Masonic order of which he was a member. The sympathy of the entire community goes out to the stricken family. Indianola Reporter Friday 15 March 1912

 

 

 

Baby is Called-After suffering nearly all the short time of his life on earth, Claire, the baby boy of Mr. and Mrs. W.M. Gardner, died March 18, 1912, lacking but two days of living till the first anniversary of his birth. The funeral was held on his birthday, March 20. The heartfelt sympathy of everyone goes out to the bereaved parents. Friday 22 March 1912

Fatal Accident-Last Saturday Mrs. Mandana J. Scott fell down the cellar stairway, at the residence of son, Ralph Scott, of Lincoln, Nebraska with whom she made her home, and he found her lifeless body lying at the foot of the stairs when he came home at noon. Her skull was crushed and she had been dead about half an hour. She had been alone in the house, all the rest of the family being at work down town, and she started for the basement to put fuel in the furnace when she evidently fell and struck heavily on her head on the cement floor. The deceased was born May 20, 1855, and died March 16, 1912. She is survived by one daughter, four sons and two brothers. Her body was brought to this city and funeral services were held at the home of her son E.O. Scott, a conductor for the Burlington, the Rev. Alfric J.R. Goldsmith of the Episcopal church, officiating, and the remains interred in Longview cemetery. The heartfelt sympathy of the whole community is extended to the family in their sudden affliction. Friday 22 March 1912

J.H. Rice Dies-Last Saturday February 23, 1912, J.H. Rice died at his home in Danbury. He had been suffering for some time with rheumatism and two weeks ago he had a stroke of paralysis from which he never fully recovered. The deceased as born in Springfield, Ohio, January 10, 1840. He resided in this city for about twenty-three years. About eight years ago he moved to Danbury where he has made his home until his death. His body was brought to this city Monday and funeral services were held in the Baptist church in the afternoon, under the auspices of the Maccabee lodge, of which he was a member, and his remains interred in Longview cemetery. Friday 1 April 1912

 

 

Mrs. J.L. Scott Dies-Mrs. James L. Scott died March 28, 1912, at her late home four miles northwest of this city. The funeral services were held at the residence Sunday afternoon, Rev. D.L. McBride officiating. Emily Honnold was born in Belmont county, Ohio September 9, 1826. She married James L. Scott March 5, 1854. Eleven children were born of this union seven of whom and her husband survive her. They moved to this county two years ago last month. The sympathy of the community is extended to the bereaved family. Friday 5 April 1912

Marion-From the Enterprise: Fred Tauber, was born in Germany Nov. 4, 1872. Came to Red Willow county with his brothers Lewis and John in 1880 or 1890 and has since lived in the vicinity of Danbury. Married to Miss Selma Miller March 14, 1901. To this union three children were born two boys and one girl, all of whom with the two brothers survive, to mourn his untimely loss. He died Thursday March 21st, 1912 after a short illness from pneumonia. Lewis Tauber is now located at Mobile, Alabama and could not be reached in time for the funeral. Friday 5 April 1912

Susan Amanda Horton was born January 18th, 1849 near Redford, Lawrence Co., Indiana. Died at her home near Lebanon, Nebr., March 21st, 1912, aged 63 years, 2 months and 3 days. She came to Iowa in 1877 where she was married to Leroy F. Nichols, March 14th 1878; to this union two children were born, a girl and a boy. Mrs. Flora Feichter and Lawrence Nichols, both residing near Lebanon. Mr. Nichols died July 16, 1904. Mr. and Mrs. Nichols located near Lebanon., Neb. in the spring of 1880, having lived here continuously since that time. She leaves beside the two children, two brothers and two sisters, Henry, John L. and Miss Beda Horton of Lebanon, Nebr. and Mrs. Lucy Groves of Arkansas City, Kans. to mourn her loss. Friday 5 April 1912

 

 

 

O.P. DeLong Dies-Monday morning about 8:30 o’clock Oliver P. DeLong, father of Elmer E. DeLong, after a long illness, died at the home of his son in this city, aged 83 years. He was a fine old gentleman, of many excellent qualities. The funeral services were held at the residence of his son Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 under the auspices of J.K. Barnes Post, G.A.R. The sympathy of the community is extended to the bereaved family. Friday 19 Apr 1912

Obituary-Jessie B. Nickerson was born in York Co., Nebr. September 16th, 1871 died at his home near Lebanon, Red Willow County, Nebr. April 8th, 1912, aged 40 years, 6 months and 19 days. He was married to Josephine Anderson at York, Nebr. Sept. 17th, 1899. Residing since his marriage in York and adjoining counties until this spring having moved to Lebanon with his family about a month before his death, expecting to make this his home. He leaves a wife and six children. Friday 19 April 1912

Burned to Death-Lucy, the five year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ogorzolka, living a few miles southwest of town met with a horrible accident yesterday which resulted in her death a few hours later. The parents had come to town and left their oldest son, aged about 14 to burn some Russian thistles. The younger children went to the field with him and in some manner the clothing of the little girl caught fire. Her brother came to her relief but in trying to extinguish the flames had his own hands badly burned. The clothing was all burned from the little girl’s body and the flesh cooked to a crisp. Dr. McCabe was called but found nothing could be done for the unfortunate child except to alleviate the suffering as much as possible. The little girl breathed her last at about five o’clock, the accident having occurred soon after noon. Cambridge Clarion Friday 26 April 1912

Mrs. Geo. Dack Dies-Mrs. George Dack died at her late home, ten miles southwest of this city Tuesday, April 30, 1912. Nettie Swartz was born in this county August 2, 1892, and was the youngest child of Mr. and Mrs. Francis Swartz. She was married to George Dack, October 7, 1908, to which union two children were born, both of whom with the husband survive her. The funeral services were held at her late home, Wednesday, May 1, Rev. L.E. Lewis officiating and her remains interred in Riverview cemetery in this city. The bereaved family have the heartfelt sympathy of everyone in their sorrow. Friday 3 May 1912

Died-Sylva Margaret the infant daughter of Orville and Bessie McFarland, Born April 19th, 1912 and died May 5th, 1912. Aged 16 days. Funeral service was conducted by Rev. W.J. Eby Monday afternoon and the remains interred in the Wilsonville cemetery. Friday 10 May 1912

Obituary-One of the largest funerals ever held in this part of the country occurred last Sunday morning when the remains of Mrs. S.H. Stilgebouer were laid to rest in the Danbury cemetery. She had been sick for several weeks during which time she suffered intense pain. All that medical skill could do for her was done but her sickness proved to be beyond human aid, and at noon May 16 she breathed her last. Since that time a deep gloom has been cast over the entire community as she was respected and loved by all who knew her. The funeral service which was held at the home in Marion was conducted by Rev. William Richards of Holdrege, a former pastor and very dear friend of the deceased. Sabra Estella Oblinger was born on a farm in Filmore Co., Nebraska, Feb. 4th, 1875. In 1880 she was deprived of her mother and very soon after with her father and sisters, moved to Minnesota. After a period of two years she returned to Nebraska, moving to Kansas later, and then to Hickory Co., Mo., where on August 5th, 1893 she was married to Solomon H. Stilgebouer. Since that time she has resided in Nebraska, the last six years in Marion. Three children, Neta, Glen and Beth and the husband mourn the loss of a mother and a wife. Friday 31 May 1912

Andrew Cruson, a farmer, living 3 1/2 miles and 2 miles west of Marion, took his own life Monday night by shooting himself through the head with a 32 calibre revolver. The Crusons came here from Stultz, Missouri, about three years ago and settled on the place where they now live. Mr. Cruson has had lots of sickness during the past winter, was completely blind for awhile and lost the use of one eye entirely. Some seem to think his mind was deranged, but this belief does not seem to be general in the neighborhood. He was a little over sixty years old. Besides those already mentioned he leaves a married daughter in Missouri. The funeral was held at the home at 9 o’clock Wednesday morning and the remains laid to rest in the Oberlin cemetery. Friday 19 July 1912

Bales’ Baby Dies-The fifteen months old baby boy of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Bales died last Thursday after an illness of several days from summer complaint. Services were held at the home in East McCook and the remains were laid to rest in Longview cemetery. The parents have the sympathy of all in their bereavement. Friday 2 August 1912

Baby Dies-A baby boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Hegenberger, last Friday, died after only a few hours existence. Services were held at the home Saturday and the little one was buried in Longview cemetery. The heartfelt sympathy of their many friends is extended to the father and mother. Friday 2 August 1912

Cashen Baby Dies-The baby boy born to Mr. and Mrs. James Cashen, June 4, 1912, died Saturday, July 27, at their home nine miles south of Indianola. Funeral services were held at the home Sunday and interment was in Calvary cemetery. The bereaved parents have the heartfelt sympathy of all. Friday 2 August 1912

Joseph Menard Dies-Wednesday evening, July 31, 1912, at 6:20, Joseph Menard, who has been suffering from a stroke of paralysis for the past month, died at his home on First street East. For some time he had been failing in health, but he was stricken suddenly some time during the night of Tuesday, June 25, and was found unconscious in the morning when he did not appear as usual for breakfast. His condition was considered then very serious and his children were sent for and came. He rallied somewhat and seemed to gain some strength until Wednesday when he suddenly grew worse and the end came soon afterward. Joseph Paul Menard was born in Quebec, Canada, January 25, 1834. He went to Chicago in 1858 and entered into business and was successful. He was married to Miss Emilie Refinot, July 3, 1862, to this union five daughters were born, four of whom survive: Mrs. Delphine E. Rinker, Mrs. Ida F. Harris, Mrs. Josephine E. Milev, Miss Amie E. Menard and Emilie E. who died when four years old. Mrs. Menard died in June 1911. He closed his business in Chicago, moved to this city in 1884, and opened a general merchandise store, in which he was successful He sold out several years ago and retired from active life. Mr. Menard was identified with the growth and upbuilding of the city, and was active in municipal affairs in its early days. In 1893 he was a member of the council and The Republican prints half tone of the officers at that time, which will be interesting to all readers ancient history of McCook and showing Mr. Menard’s picture. The deceased has been one of McCook’s best known citizens during his residence here. He was a kind and indulgent husband and father, and the sympathy of everyone goes out to the afflicted family. The funeral services will be held in St. Patrick’s church Saturday morning at 10 o’clock. Friday 2 August 1912

Funeral of Joseph Menard-Funeral services over the remains of the late Joseph Menard were held Saturday morning at 10 o’clock in St. Patrick’s Catholic church, the Rev. Wm. Patton, O.M.I., pastor, celebrating the requiem high mass. The ball bearers were from McCook Lodge No. 1126, Knights of Columbus of which the departed was a member and were: C.J. Ryan, George Elbert, Joseph Harr, Frank Real, John Randel, and James M. Brady. The services at the cemetery were conducted by the Knights. The services were largely attended and in respect of an old and esteemed citizen the business houses of the city closed during the church services. Friday 9 August 1912

Richard Lumb, an old settler of Red Willow county, who has been sick for some time, passed to the great beyond last Saturday evening at 5:40 o’clock, aged 82 years. He was born in England Feb. 27, 1830. Came to this country when 20 years of age locating at Whatcheer, Iowa, at which place he lived many years as a coal miner. He also prospected in the west for a number of years, coming to this county about 27 years ago where he lived until his death. He leaves a sick wife, a son and several stepsons and daughters to mourn his loss. Ben Rawley, his stepson, preached the funeral service which was a very large one; interment in Danbury cemetery. Friday 9 August 1912

Frederick A. Daniels was born on the home three miles northeast of Bartley October 20, 1889. He spent his school days in Bartley school and was well and favorably known throughout the community. He took his life by shooting himself with a shot gun last Wednesday evening about 8:30 o’clock. No cause is given for the act, although he had been in poor health for sometime and it is thought he was mentally deranged. Friday 9 August 1912

The entire community was greatly shocked last Tuesday by the announcement that Robert Hume was dead. Death occurred at the family home three miles north of Indianola, and was caused by a stroke of apoplexy. He had apparently been in the best of health up to the moment he was stricken, and his children had no premonition of the nearness of death’s messenger. He was talking with his family, suddenly fell to the floor unconscious. Death followed a few hours later. Robert Wilson Hume was born in Blandinsville, Illinois, July 3, 1843, in which vicinity he spent the days of his early life. When he reached his majority he was united in marriage with Juliet Archer, to whom were born four children: Charles A., Paul H., Ralph W. and Leila, all of whom are living and well known here with the exception of the senior son, Charles, who resides at Ogden, Utah. The family came to Nebraska and Red Willow county in 1882. In May, 1910, the beloved wife and mother passed to her final reward. The deceased, at the outbreak of the civil war, cast his lot with the fortunes of the northern forces and enlisted as a member of Co. I Illinois Cavalry in 1862, and served with honor until the close of hostilities in 1865. He was a member of Indianola Post No. 152 G.A.R., the Odd Fellows, and the Masons, being affiliated with the latter at McCook. Friday 9 August 1912

Mrs. Richard Lumb who has been very ill for the past three weeks passed to the great beyond last Sunday just eight days after her husband. The deceased, aged 81 years, was an old resident of this vicinity moving here in an early day. She moved from here to Oregon where she resided for a number of years, coming back about 20 years ago. She was married to Richard Lumb about 17 years ago. The funeral services were held at the Methodist church Tuesday afternoon. The body was taken to Seattle, Wash. by her daughters to be buried by the side of her first husband, Mr. Rowley. Friday 16 August 1912

Franklin Francis was born in Dark Co., Ohio, March 7, 1837, died at his home near Wilsonville Nebr., August 10, 1912. He moved with his parents to Iowa where he was married to Margaret Van Cleave July 15, 1858. To them eight children were born, six of whom survive him. He moved with his family to Nebraska in 1883. His wife was called to her long rest Sept. 5, 1907. He was married again to Permedia Brink Jan. 30, 1909, who with his children, 26 grand children, 2 great grand children and one brother are left to mourn his loss. Friday 26 August 1912

Our beloved wife passed to that glorious reward the Father had prepared for her, Saturday evening August 10, 1912 at 5 o’clock. Our home is empty, our hearts are aching. We cannot say more. Nettie Eno was born July 5, 1888 in Decatur county, Kansas and was the daughter of Mrs. F.P. Eno. She was married to John L. Newman at Fruita, Colo., Jan. 8, 1908 and has since resided in Danbury. Her death was very unexpected and a shock to the community. She was very quite and unassuming in manner, charitable and kind in disposition and a faithful and loving wife and mother. She leaves a heart broken husband and three little girls, the oldest, Lucile, aged 4 years, Genevieve aged 3 and the youngest a tiny babe nine days old. Besides these she leaves a father, mother, two sisters, two brothers and many other sorrowing relatives and friends to mourn her untimely death. Funeral services were held at the J.L. Sims home (Where they had been living) by Rev. Wintjen. A large concourse of friends and neighbors paid their last tribute of respect to the deceased and with loving hearts and tender hands she was laid to rest in the Danbury cemetery. Friday 26 August 1912

Thursday evening the neighbors nearby were alarmed by the finding of Mrs. Sarah McCarl lying unconscious at the foot of the cellar stairs at the home of her daughter Mrs. Ida Burney, who lives next to her mother’s home, by Miss Donisthorpe, who roomed with Mrs. McCarl, about six o’clock. Several men who were called ran to her assistance and carried her to her own home. Dr. McDivitt had been called by telephone and he was there almost as soon as the men had carried her into the house. An examination disclosed a bad fracture of the skull, and that an operation would be necessary. Drs. McKay and Fahnestock were called in consultation and it was performed. None of her children were at the home at the time. Mrs. Burney being in Harvard visiting her sister, Mrs. Geo. H. Thomas; J.R. McCarl and wife in Lincoln, and T.E. McCarl in Red Cloud and G.I. Burney out on his run. Mrs. T.E. McCarl was home and came at once and the children all notified. They arrived that night on the midnight trains. The unfortunate lady never regained consciousness and died about three o’clock the next afternoon. Sarah A. Gossllee was born at London, Ohio, March 1, 1849; was married in May 1866 to John Henry McCarl, in Iowa. She was the mother of eight children; two dying in infancy; Charles, who was a conductor for the Burlington, died from injuries received in this city, while making up his train, in 1898; Bert, also a conductor, died of heart failure while checking his train at Akron, preparatory to starting for McCook, in 1905. Her husband died in Hastings in 1893. She moved to this city with her children shortly after her husband’s death and has resided here ever since. Mrs. McCarl was always of a genial, sunny nature, doing good where ever she could, and a most excellent neighbor. She will be missed greatly by all who knew her. She was a member of the Methodist church since her girlhood, and has always been an active worker in church societies. The funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at her late home, her pastor, Rev. L.E. Lewis, officiating and were attended by many of her friends. The profusion of flowers and floral emblems attested the high esteem in which she was held in this community. The heartfelt sympathy of everyone is extended to the family in their sudden bereavement. Friday 26 August 1912

Buried Here-The body of Thomas Real, who is a nephew of Frank Real, of this city, died suddenly at his home in Dorchester, Wednesday evening, August 21, aged 16 years was brought here for burial. The funeral services were held in St. Patrick’s church last Friday morning and the remains interred in Calvary cemetery. His death was caused by concussion of the brain resulting from a blow on the head from the fist of a playmate during an altercation resulting in blows on the previous day. The family of the deceased formerly resided in this county. The family have the sincere sympathy of all in their sorrow. Friday 30 August 1912

Bartley-From the Inter Ocean: Last Sunday evening about 7 o’clock Mrs. W.W. LeMasters passed away at her home in this place of heart failure while her son Roy helped her to lie down. Monday morning at 11 o’clock the funeral services were held over the body at the M.E. church, conducted by Rev. C.A. Norlin, of Indianola. Malinda Margaret Hafhill was born April 26, 1846, in Gallue county, Ohio; died August 18, 1912 at her home in this place; age 66 years, 3 months, 23 days. She was married to W.W. LeMaster October 17, 1869, to which union six children were born, three girls and two boys, remain to mourn the loss of a loving mother and a true companion and friend. She came to Red Willow county in 1884 with her husband and family and has resided here since. Friday 30 August 1912

Louis Lawritson Dies-After a long illness Louis Lawritson, agent for the Burlington railway company at Trenton, died at Glenwood Springs, Colorado, Sunday, August 25, 1912. The deceased has been in the employ of the railway company for many years and is well known here where his father and brother, Matthew, live. He was a man of many sterling qualities, highly esteemed by every one who knew him. He was a member of the Congregational church and of the Masonic, A.O.U.W. and Odd Fellow orders. The sincere sympathy of everyone is extended to the sorrowing family and relatives. Louis Lawritson was born November 4, 1862 in Taulor, Denmark, Europe; came to America in 1882; he began working for the Burlington in 1887, and has been in the station service of the company continuously ever since. He was married to Miss Marie Fredrickson in this city, March 26, 1899 to which union three children were born, who with his widow, four brothers and his father survive him. The funeral services were held in the Congregational church in this city Wednesday afternoon under the auspices of the Masonic order, Rev. J.G. Russell of Ong, Neb., his former pastor at Beaver City, officiating and Rev. Carl Anderson , of Trenton, assisting. The body was interred in the family lot in Longview cemetery. Friday 30 August 1912

Mrs. Edwards Dies-Mrs. Charles Edwards died at the hospital Monday evening at six o’clock after an illness of several weeks which resulted in pneumonia. Miss Letta Hurst was born in December 1893, was married to Charles Edwards April 28, 1912. The sincere sympathy of all is extended to the bereaved family. The funeral services were held in the German Congregational church Wednesday afternoon and her body laid to rest in Riverview cemetery. Friday 30 August 1912

This community was greatly shocked this Thursday by the death of Mrs. Henry Crabtree Sr., which occurred about 9 o’clock at the family home in North Indianola. Funeral services will be held at the home tomorrow afternoon at 2 o’clock. A detailed notice will be given next week. Friday 30 August 1912

Mrs. Stewart Dies-Mrs. Mathew Stewart died at her home on 1st street west Wednesday morning after an illness of a couple of weeks, following an operation for appendicitis, surrounded by all her family and her parents. Mary Adaline Weygint, daughter of William and Sophrona Weygint was born at Syracuse, N.Y., Nov., 18, 1866. With her parents she moved to Indianola in 1871. She was married December 8, 1886 to Mathew Stewart. To this union three children were born, Josephine, Ora and Jessie. Two brothers and two sisters are also left to mourn her loss: Mrs. I.J. Starbuck, of Salt Lake City; Mrs. L.A. Warner, Antigo, Wis.; W.B. Weygint, Neely, Nebr.; H.D. Weygint, Meadow Grove, Nebr. She joined the Methodist church in February 1895 and has been a faithful and sincere member. For a number of years she lived in Frontier county moving to this city about two years ago. The deceased was highly esteemed by all who knew her, was an excellent wife, a devoted mother, and a faithful member of the Methodist church. The funeral services will be held in the Methodist church at 10 o’clock Saturday morning. Friday 6 September 1912

Death Brought Relief-After being an invalid for years most of that time helpless and in pain, Mrs. Mary Shultz died Saturday, September 21, 1912, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ballew in Excelsior Springs, Missouri, aged 84 years, 6 months and 13 days. She has made her home with the daughter since the death of her husband, and during her residence in this city made many friends. During the latter part of her illness she suffered intense pain and to her in her helpless condition death was a welcomed guest. But the end came peacefully, without pain. She was a sincere Christian and was an active member of the Baptist church. The funeral services were held last Sunday in the Baptist church in Excelsior Springs and her body interred in the cemetery there. The sincere sympathy of everyone here goes out to the sorrowing family. Friday 27 September 1912

John Flury, born July 26, 1845, died Sept. 16, 1912. Aged 67 years, 1 month and 21 days. Mr. Flury was united in marriage to Elizabeth Wertz thirty-eight years ago in Johnson county, Iowa, where they resided eight years, moving to Nebraska 27 years ago and to Denver a short time ago. To this union seven children were born. The widow, five children and six grandchildren survive him. He served in the French Prussian war as a soldier in the French army seven years. Friday 4 October 1912

 

 

William H. Smith-Who has been a resident of this county for over thirty years, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. C.I. Markwad, Friday September 27, 1912, after an illness of about two months. He was born in Mentor, Ohio, June 2, 1838. The family moved to Michigan. He was married to Miss Emma Severence, March 12, 1876, to which union six children were born, their only son dying in childhood. The widow, five daughters and a brother survive him. He was a member of the 11th Reg. Mich. Inf. during the civil war and of the J.K. Barnes post G.A.R. of this city. He moved from Iowa to this state in 1879, taking up a homestead near here and has resided in this county ever since. He was a faithful and consistent member of the Baptist church of this city. The funeral services were held in that church Sunday morning at 11 o’clock. Rev. D.L. McBride officiating, and his body interred in Riverview cemetery under the auspices of the G.A. R. Post. The services were attended by a large congregation showing the high esteem in which he was held in the community. The sympathy of all is extended to the bereaved family. Friday 4 October 1912

George H. Zimmerman-died at his home in this city Monday, September 30, 1912. He had been sick for just a year having had a light stroke of paralysis at that time and he gradually declined until the end. He was born in Stark county, Ill., May 22, 1842 and was 70 years, 4 months and 8 days old at his death. He resided in Illinois until 1883, when he removed to Fillmore county, Nebraska. In 1891 he came to Red Willow county where he continued to reside until his death. He enlisted in the 3rd Ill. Cav. in the spring of 1864 serving until November 1865. He was married to Margarette Marsh December 12, 1846. Ten children were born to them all of whom together with the wife survive him. The children are Mesdames Henry and Ed. Mitchell of McCook, Mrs. Geo. Dovie, Box Elder, Mrs. Fred Traphagen, Quick, Charley, Alva, Ella, Dora, Clara and Lora of McCook. The funeral services were held at the home Wednesday afternoon and were largely attended. Rev. D.L. McBride, officiating. His body was interred in Riverview cemetery under auspices of the G.A.R. Post. Te deceased was highly respected by all who knew him and the sympathy of the whole community is extended to the bereaved family. Card of Thanks-We wish to extend our sincere and heartfelt thanks to all our friends and neighbors and the J.K. Barnes Post, G.A.R. and the F.O.E. lodge of McCook, for their kind assistance and sympathy during our sorrow at the death of our beloved husband, and father. Mrs. G.H. Zimmerman and family. Friday 4 October 1912

Bartley-From the Inter Ocean-Mrs. John W. Wolf died at her home in Bartley, Sept. 20, 1912. She had been failing in health for sometime and the end was not unexpected. Cathrine E. Miller was born in Taylor county, West Va., Nov. 17, 1843 and in April 1867 was married to John W. Wolf at Rockford, Taylor county, West Va. To this union five children were born, all of whom, together with the husband survive her and all but one, Mrs. John Long of Colfax, Wash., being present at the time of her death. Burial was in the Bartley cemetery. The sympathy of a large number of friends goes out to the bereaved family in this their hour of sorrow. Friday 4 October 1912

Danbury-From the News-Last Thursday night, Mrs. N.D. Wyckoff, was mustered out from a long life of usefulness and noble service. It was not until the last three or four days prior to her death that she was considered dangerously ill. She had been suffering more or less, the past year with stomach trouble and the progress of the disease which finally proved fatal was long, tedious and exquisitely painful, but was borne by the heroic sufferer with sublime patience and with no word of complaint. Rebecca Jane Berrisford was born in Philadelphia, Pa., July 8, 1853. From there she moved with her parents to Illinois. In 1876 she came to Red Willow county, Neb., where she was married to N.D. Wyckoff, July 4, 1877. To this union five children were born all living and present at the funeral. She leaves, besides her husband and five children, to mourn her untimely loss two brothers and one sister, all of Biggsville, Ills. The sympathy of a large circle of friends go out to the bereaved family. Friday 4 October 1912

 

Baby Granell-Helen, aged seven months, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Granell, who live southwest of town died last Thursday and the body was taken to Cambridge for burial Friday. The mother had gone to Omaha the Sunday before to be operated upon for appendicitis and has not returned. The sympathy of all is extended to the afflicted parents. Friday 4 October 1912

Jacob Steinmetz-Another veteran of the civil war was called from earth early Thursday morning, October 3, 1912 making three old soldiers who have died in this city in the past week. Jacob Steinmetz was born in New York City, November, 1840. He came to Nebraska and located at Sutton in 1872, and moved to this city in 1888, where he had been appointed receiver in the Land Office and has lived here ever since. He was married to Miss Minnie Flack, at Sutton in 1878. To this union there were born five girls and one boy. The widow and daughters survive him. He served during the civil war in an Ohio regiment. Mr. Steinmetz has been in failing health for some time and yet his death was a surprise to many who had not heard of his condition. He had many friends but of late years he has not been in active business and kept close to his home. The funeral services will be held at this late home Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock under the auspices of the G.A.R. Post. We extend to all our friends, neighbors and J.K. Barnes Post, G.A.R., our heart felt thanks for the many kindnesses and sympathy given us during our affliction in the death of our husband and father. Mrs. Jacob Steinmetz and family Friday 4 October 1912

Called to Rest-After an illness of several years death came to relieve Wm. M. Morrissey from his suffering Tuesday, October 22, 1912, in the hospital at Chester, Illinois where he has been the past four months. The deceased was born in Hadley, Massachusetts, March 26, 1873, and moved with his parents to Jacksonville, Illinois three years later, where he grew to manhood and there was married to Miss Katherine Keating about nine years ago. He was elected as city attorney of that city for three terms. His health failing him he came to McCook about five years ago and took up his residence here. His parents and sister following him shortly afterwards. Two years ago he went back to Jacksonville to settle up his business affairs there and gradually grew worse until the end came Tuesday. His mother and sister left here Monday evening to be with him when he passed away but the end came while they were on the way to him. His remains were taken to his old home in Jacksonville and the funeral services held there yesterday morning. He leaves to mourn, his death his widow, mother, father and sister, beside a host of friends. Mr. Morrissey was a genial and most lovable gentleman, who made friends of all he met and those who knew or met him here extend their sincere sympathy to the bereft and sorrowing family. Friday 25 October 1912

F.D. Burgess Dies-A telegram received by Miss Maud Burgess Saturday October 19, announced the death of her brother, Frank D. Burgess, early that morning at his home in Long Beach, California. Frank D. Burgess was born in Ottawa, Illinois, June 7, 1855. He came to Arapahoe in 1878 and was married there June 8, the next year to Miss Florence Gaines. Four children were born of this union, three of whom, Mrs. John Marshall, of this city, Mrs. N.D. Bush of Oberlin, Kansas and George J. Burgess, of Long Beach, California, together with his wife and one sister survive him. He moved to this city about 1881 and started in the plumbing business which he continued until about three years ago when he sold out on account of failing health and shortly afterwards moved to California, hoping the change would be beneficial but grew worse until the end came. The deceased was well known in this part of the state and had many friends who extend to the sorrowing family their heartfelt sympathy. All his family were at his bedside when the end came and his remains were interred at Long Beach. Friday 25 October 1912

Furnas Pioneer Dies-Capt. J.M. Lee, a pioneer of Furnas county died at the Ingleside asylum Sunday night and his remains were taken to Oxford for burial. Captain Lee was in his 85th year at the time of his death. He was a veteran of the Civil war and had been a member of the legislature both in Iowa and in Nebraska. He has four children living near Hyannis, this state. Funeral services were held Monday. The deceased was well known to many in this city and county. Friday 25 October 1912

Enos Rishel Dies-The death of Enos Rishel Wednesday morning was a painful surprise to this community as only a few knew he had been ailing. For some time he had been suffering and it became so serious that an immediate operation was necessary for relief from the intense pain. He went to the McCook General Hospital Friday morning and was operated upon. His condition from the first was serious. The operation gave relief and he recovered from the effects seemingly, but he became worse suddenly early Wednesday morning and death followed soon afterward. The deceased was an estimable man who had the respect and confidence of the whole community. He was unassuming, genial and a most exemplary citizen, and the community as well as his family will miss him. Enos Rishel was born in 1842 at Lafayette, Indiana: he moved to Gage county, Nebraska, about forty years ago and has lived in McCook since 1897. He was married to Miss Sarah Mangus in 1880. He is survived by his widow and seven children: Mrs. Mary Chapman, Mrs. Lyda Schutzmeir, Martin, Bessie, Hattie, Willie and Ethel. He was a member of the Seventh Day Advent church. The funeral services will be held in that church Saturday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock. The sincere sympathy of the whole community goes out to the sorrowing family. Friday 8 November 1912

Roy Pate Dies-Leroy Pate, son of Mr. and Mrs. Milo Pate, aged 6 years, died Tuesday morning, November 12, 1912 of Brights disease at their home, 212 Second street West. The funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon, Rev. Neal Johnson officiating, and the body buried in Riverview cemetery. The sympathy of the community goes out to the bereaved family. Friday 15 November 1912

Marion-From the Enterprise: Lawson Kennedy, who for the past six years had made his home with his sister, Sarah Kennedy, several miles northwest of Marion died very suddenly of heart failure last Friday morning, aged 73 years. He was born in what is now LaSalle county, Ill. but had lived for many years at Fairmont and Exeter this state. He is survived by three brothers and three sisters. Funeral services were held in the Fowler school house Sunday and the remains were laid to rest in the cemetery near where the brothers live in this county. Friday 15 November 1912

Benjamin F. Olcott was born in Huron county, Ohio, February 28, 1845 and died at his home in this city, Tuesday, December 3, 1912 at 6:20 a.m. His death occurred at the age of 67 years, 9 months and 5 days. Benjamin Olcott was married to Miss Desotine Odell in Huron county, Ohio, February 18, 1868. They moved from Ohio to Brookline, Iowa, where they lived until 1884, when they came to this city. Five children, two boys and there girls were born to them all of whom with his widow, are left to mourn his death. During the civil war Mr. Olcott enlisted in Co. I 10th Mich. Infantry at Flint, Michigan. During the war he received injuries from which he suffered the remainder of his life, the last twelve years of which he has been an invalid. The sincerest sympathy of the many friends go out to the family in their grief. All the children we present at the funeral services, except Mrs. B.W. Luftsin of Auburn, Washington. Funeral services were held at the home yesterday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, Rev. D.L. McBride officiating under the auspices of the G.A.R. Post. Friday 6 December 1912

A Sad Death-Tuesday afternoon O.N. Rector shot himself at 3 o’clock and died about forty five minutes afterward without recovering consciousness. He has been suffering from an attack of grippe for several days, and his financial matters were worrying him, and it seems evident he suddenly became deranged. He went to the cellar and shot himself twice, once in the side the other time in the left temple. His wife and son, Connie, were the only ones at home at the time. The reports of the explosions frightened them and Connie hurried to the cellar and found his father unconscious. He called the family physician, Mrs. Dr. Easterday who notified the coroner. No inquest was held as the coroner did not think it necessary. Oscar N. Rector was born July 17, 1859 at Oskaloosa, Iowa. He was married to Miss Mary A. Humphrey February 15, 1882, at New Sharon, Iowa. Twelve children were born of this union , two of whom died in infancy. The family moved to this county from Oxford and lived on their farm, southeast of town, for a time and he purchased the Brewer residence, enlarged it and moved into this city where they have lived the past several years and he and his family have been highly respected. He leaves a widow, ten children, two grand children, six brothers and a sister. The sorrowing family have the heart felt sympathy of everyone. Funeral services were held at the home yesterday afternoon at 3 o’clock, and the remains were taken to Oxford for burial. The pallbearers were selected by the Woodman Lodge, of which order he was a member. Friday 13 December 1912