1917 McCook Republican

WEDDINGS:

Joe Dack and Maude Tubbs, both of McCook were married by County Judge N.T. Jones at his office in this village, Wednesday, December 20. Friday 5 January 1917

Miss Hattie Schmidt Married Today. Miss Hattie Schmidt, of McCook, for several years stenographer in Senator Norris’ office, will be married Friday to John J. Keegan of Washington. Mr. Keegan is an Indianan and is prominent in labor circles. Washington D.C. Cor. To Word Herald. Friday 5 January 1917

Lebanon. From The Advertiser. A very pretty wedding took place at the home of Mr. And Mrs. A.B. Gibbs in Lebanon, Sunday evening at 5 o’clock, when their only daughter Gladys was united in marriage to Mr. Elmer E. Levick, of Bayard, Nebr. The young people expect to make their home in Bayard, where Mr. Levick is engaged in carpenter work. Friday 5 January 1917

Miss Lela VanPelt and Lester Sines, both of this vicinity, were married at McCook on Wednesday, Dec. 27, 1916, Judge F.M. Colfer, officiating. The bride is the youngest daughter of Mr. And Mrs. J.B. VanPelt of Sherman Tp., and the groom is the son of Mr. And Mrs. J.W. Sines of McCook, who formerly resided in Marion. Friday 5 January 1917

Miss Ellen Zimmerman and William Whister, both of the north divide were married at McCook, by Judge Colfer on Wednesday Dec. 20th, 1916. Friday 5 January 1917

At the Methodist parsonage in this city on Friday afternoon of December 22, promptly at three o’clock the marriage of Lloyd W. Thomas of Stratton, Nebraska and Miss Mildred A. Evans, of Trenton, Nebraska, occurred, A.A. Kerber performing the ceremony. The young couple expect to make their home about two and one-half mile north of town. Good wishes follow them with a desire of a long and happy married life. Friday 5 January 1917

Happily Wedded. One of the most pleasant surprises ever sprung on the unsuspecting inhabitants of our little metropolis took place December 28th, 1916, when Joseph Girardin, a worthy employee of C.B. & Q. here returned from Denver, bringing a bride with him. We have known the groom for a long time, and his modest retiring and reticent manner led us to think he would be among the last victims of Dan Cupid. But he stole a march on us all, and the best part of it all is, they are to make their home in McCook. The ceremony, which took place at the home of the bride, Miss Gladys Troctor, in Denver, was very impressive, and was a double ring affair, Father Gray, of the Emanuel Episcopal church officiating. Mr. Palmer Parker, of Greeley, sand the “Perfect Day” in a masterful manner and all the guests present were unanimous in declaring it was one of the most beautiful weddings of the season. The many friends of the groom here extends to the happy young couple their heartiest congratulations and best wishes for a long and prosperous life. Friday 5 January 1917

Double Wedding. Inadvertently, the account of the double wedding of Miss Inez Clark and Chester C. Reed, and Miss Edna Clark and Granville Fletcher Wells, which took place December 27, was omitted from last week’s issue of The Democrat. The wedding took place at 11 o’clock in the morning at the Christian church, the ceremony being conducted by Rev. Leroy Munyon assisted by Rev. J.H. Tice. The church was beautifully decorated with smilax and white roses, with two large arches and bells made of the flowers. Before the ceremony, Miss Marcia McKay, accompanied by Miss Lela Banar, sang, “I Love You Truly”. The Misses Clark entered the church from one side, preceded by Rev. Tice while the young men entered from the other side preceded by Rev. Munyon. The prayer and benediction were given by Rev. Tice, and the ring ceremony, the bridal party march out the center aisle. The ushers were Lyl Foster, Arthur Nicholas and Kennet See. The brides wore dresses of white taffeta and lace and bridal veil caught with a wreath of white narcissus. They carried bouquets of tea roses. A reception was given at the home of Eli Smith at noon to the immediate family and close friends. The house was decorated in white and green and the color scheme was further carried out by the place cards which were white bells tied with green ribbon. Both the young ladies formerly lived in McCook, Nebr. Miss Inez Clark is a graduate of the Normal school at Kearney and attended the University of Nebraska. She taught school in Spalding, Neb., and last year was at Miltonville, Kansas. It was while she was here that she met Mr. Reed. They will make their home in Aberdeen, South Dakota. Miss Edna Clark has made her home here with her uncle, Eli Smith, for about seven years. Mr. Wells was raised in Jamson and has been farming for a couple of years. With in a short time, Mr. And Mrs. Wells will leave here for Wyoming. Out-of-town guests at the wedding were: W.T. Clark, father of the two ladies; Miss Ella Enburg of St. Joseph, Mo., Miss Lillan Reeder of Des Moines and John Markee of Iowa Fall, Iowa. Osceola, Iowa, Democrat, Friday 10 January 1917

Reid-Sullivan. Miss Hazel Reid, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. D.J. Reid, and Mr. Frank Sullivan were married Wednesday evening at 5 o’clock at the Methodist parsonage, Rev. H.C. Seidel, officiating. The wedding was a quiet one. The young people left that evening for Denver for a short visit. They will make their home in this city. The bride is a beautiful young lady of many accomplishments and popular with her associates. The groom is employed by the Burlington railroad as brakeman. He is a fine young man of good habits and industrious. Their many friends, with whom The Republican joins, wish forth in a long happy and prosperous future. Friday 17 January 1917

Bayless-Chipman. Mrs. Rose Bayless and Mr. G.E. Chipman, both of this city were married in Omaha, Thursday, January 18, 1917. Both have a large circle of friends here, where they have lived for many years. Mrs. Bayless left here a couple of months ago for Des Moines, Iowa., to visit her mother and sister during the winter and the announcement of the wedding was a surprise to many of their friends here. They have the best wishes of all their friends with whom The Republican joins for a happy future. Friday 26 January 1917

Harmon-Gardner. Tuesday afternoon, January 23, 1917, Miss Ada Harmon and Mr. Clyde Gardner, both of Hamlet, were married in this city, county Judge Colfer officiating. The contracting parties were accompanied by their parents, Mr. And Mrs. Albert Harmon and Mr. And Mrs. Gardner, all of Hamlet. The bride is a grand-daughter of a brother of W.H. Harmon of this city. The happy young couple left Wednesday morning for the eastern part of the state to spend their honeymoon. They will make their home on the groom’s farm near Hamlet. Friday 26 January 1917

A letter was received from Mrs. Chester C. Reed, formerly Miss Inez Clark, a graduate of the McCook high school, and was married December 27, 1916, in Osceola, Iowa., at the same time her sister, Edna, was also married, an account of which was published in The Republican, the first of January. The letter is dated Galveston, Texas, and states they are still on their wedding trip and in a month or so will go to Mr. Reed’s farm near Northville, South Dakota, where they will make their home. Edna, who has a millinery trimmer for several seasons, the last three in Lincoln, was married at the same time to Mr. Granville F. Wells. They will make their home in Wyoming. Friday 2 February 1917

Nash-Schmitz. Miss Alice Nash and Mr. Leo Schmitz were married Wednesday, January 31, in St. Patrick’s church. Miss Genevieve McAdams and Mr. Ray Donnelly acting as bridesmaid and groomsman. The bride is the daughter of Mrs. Elizabeth Nash, and has lived here for the past twelve years, and has been employed in the telegraph office here for a couple of years. The groom is a son of Mr. And Mrs. A.J. Schmitz who live south of town. He is a graduate of the McCook high school in the class of 1914. He is at presenting traveling for a Chicago Grocery firm, and makes his headquarters here. They left Wednesday evening for a trip to Omaha and other points east, where they will visit for a month. The Republican joins their many friends in wishing them a happy and prosperous future. Friday 2 February 1917

The Sacred Heart church in this city was the scene of a very pretty triple wedding Tuesday, January 30, at 10 a.m., when the following couples were united in the holy bonds of matrimony: Edward Kircher to Miss Rosa Haag; John Haag to Miss Nellie Thomas and Charles Haag to Miss Anna Warner, the Rev. Father Stricker performing the ceremony. Friday 9 February 1917

On Wednesday morning, January 31, at the Sacred Heart church in Indianola, occurred the marriage of Miss Johannah Agnes Bergin of this community, to Mr. William A. Langdon, of Friend, Nebraska, Father Stricker performing the ceremony. After the ceremony the happy couple made their way to the bride’s home where a bountiful dinner awaited them. The bride is a daughter of Mr. And Mrs. James Bergin and is from one of the best families in this community. Friday 9 February 1917

Elmer Egle and Miss Ida Jeffries, two very popular and well known young people of the north neighborhood, were united in marriage last Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock. Friday 23 February 1917

Campbell-Wright. Miss Jennie Campbell, daughter of Mr. And Mrs. James Campbell, who live north of this city, on the Willow, and Alex Wright, Jr., of Coleman precinct, were married Wednesday evening, February 21, 1917, at the home of the bride’s parents. The young people have the best wishes of their many friends for a happy and successful future. Friday 23 February 1917

Bauer-Schroeder. Miss Mollie Bauer and Roy A. Schroeder, of Atwood, Kansas, were united in marriage Wednesday February 13, 1917, at the parsonage of St. Patrick’s church, Father A.H. Kunz, O.M.I. Officiating. The bride made her home here with Mr. And Mrs. G.L. Burney, while attending high school graduating with the class of 1914, and is a most estimable young lady. The groom is a prosperous young farmer. They will make their home on his farm near Herndon. The best wishes of a host of friends go with the young couple. Friday 23 February 1917

Philips-Budig. Miss Mabel Phillips, and Ray Budig, son of Mr. And Mrs. C.G. Budig, of this city, were married at the home of the bride’s parents in Minden, Monday afternoon, February 12, 1917. The bride who has visited here frequently has a large acquaintance among the younger set. The groom has lived here practically all his life, but for several months has been employed as machinist in the Burlington shops at Havelock. The best wishes of all their friends, with whom The Republican joins is extended to the happy couple. They will make their home in Havelock. Friday 23 February 1917

Nilander-Dutton. Monday, February 26, 1917, Miss Olga E. Nilander, of Aurora, Illinois and Mr. Ernest N. Dutton, son of W.H. Dutton, south of this city, were united in marriage at the home of Mr. And Mrs. Don Thompson, in Gerver precinct, Rev. H.C. Seidel, of this city, officiating. A sumptuous dinner was served by Mrs. Thompson. The happy young couple left that evening for a trip east for a couple of weeks and will make their home on the Dutton farm, south of McCook. Friday 2 March 1917

Baldwin-Lakin. Tuesday, February 27, 1917, Miss Clara Baldwin and Vernon N. Lakin, of Culbertson were married in the Commercial hotel parlors, Rev. H.C. Seidel, officiating. The happy young people left that evening for Virginia, where they will make their future home. Friday 2 March 1917

Lebanon. From The Advertiser. The home of Mr. And Mrs. Frank Van Vleet in Danbury was the scene of a pretty wedding Tuesday evening when at six o’clock their youngest daughter, Miss Ola, was united in marriage to Mr. Mirl Townsend. Friday 9 March 1917

Mr. Marion Reeves of this vicinity and Miss Neva Aldrich of Healy, Kans., were united in marriage at Garden City, Kansas, Wednesday, February 21st, 1917. Friday 9 March 1917

Mr. Leslie Lewis of Stamford and Miss Mae Osborn of this vicinity were married at Beaver City, Saturday, February 14th, 1917. Friday 9 March 1917

Miss Ola VanVleet and Mirl L. Townsend were married at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. And Mrs. Frank VanVleet of Danbury on Tuesday evening, at six o’clock, February 27, 1917, the Rev. J.P. Clark of Oberlin, Kans., officiating. Friday 9 March 1917

A quiet, but beautiful wedding occurred at the spacious home of Mr. And Mrs. C.B. Diehl, when their daughter Breta was united in marriage to Mr. William Wallace Westrand, of Wahoo, Wednesday afternoon at 4 o’clock. They left on No. 14 for Omaha, for a few days, after which they will be at home in Wahoo. Friday 9 March 1917

Stratton. From The News. Miss Lacey E. Snider, of Stratton, and Mr. James K. Chapman of Orleans, Nebr., went to Bloomington, Nebr., Wednesday, February 28, 1917, where they were united in marriage by the Judge, an old friend of the groom’s. The bride is well known to our readers. The groom is an employee of the Burlington railroad and has been for some time. They will make their home at Orleans at the present time. Friday 9 March 1917

Doyle-Bennett. Miss Nellie Faye Doyle and Irvin S. Bennett were married Wednesday evening March 14, 1917, Rev. H.C. Seidel, officiating. Miss Fern Bennett and Mr. Ray L. Helm, acting bridesmaid and groomsman. The wedding party then went to the home of the bride’s parents, 402 Fourth Street East, where a splendid dinner was served to the families and a few friends of the contracting parties. The bride is the daughter, of Mr. And Mrs. James S. Doyle and the groom a son of Mr. And Mrs. Scott Bennett, both the young people were born and raised in this county and are highly esteemed by all who know them. They will make their home on the Scott Bennett place, east of this city. Friday 16 March 1917

Poh-Harris. Sunday afternoon, Miss Martha Poh, daughter of Mr. And Mrs. Geo. Poh, of South McCook, and Otis Harris were joined in marriage at the Methodist parsonage. Both young people are well known to many of the younger set. The bride was born and has lived in this city all her life. The groom has made his home in this city practically all his life, also. An elaborate six o’clock dinner was given in their honor at the home of his sister, Mrs. Fred Billings. The Republican joins their many friends in congratulations and best wishes. Friday 6 April 1917

Stratton. From The News. Miss Nella Mclean and Mr. Fred Dame were married by the county judge in Trenton Wednesday evening of last week. They left immediately after the ceremony for a few days visit with relatives at Farnam and Gothenburg. The returned to Stratton Sunday evening, and will reside on a farm north of town. Friday 13 April 1917

Warren-Cochran. The announcement of the marriage of Miss Ruth Easterday Warren and Mr. Elvin Perry Cochran, on Tuesday, April 10, 1917, at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. And Mrs. U.J. Warren, in Ft. Morgan, Colorado, has been received at this office. The groom is the son of Mr. And Mrs. Samuel M. Cochran, of Seattle, Washington. Both the bride and groom were born in this city and lived here until their parents moved to where they now reside several years ago. They graduated the past year from the university, and are most estimable young people, who have a host of friends in their respective homes, as well as in this city, with whom we join in extending hearty congratulations and best wishes for their future happiness and welfare. Mrs. Sarah Rowell, grandmother of the bride, Dr. Emma M. Easterday, and Mr. And Mrs. Albert Barnett, of this city, were guests at the wedding. Mr. And Mrs. Cochran will be “at home” to their friends after June 15, 1917, at their home in Ft. Morgan, Colorado. Friday 13 April 1917

Houlihan-Cox. Tuesday morning Miss Marie Houlihan and Harry W. Cox, were married at St. Patrick’s parsonage, Rev. A.H. Kunz, O.M.I., officiating. Both young people have lived in this city and vicinity practically all their lives and are very popular with their friends. The bride has been employed in the C.H. Boyle Law office, as stenographer. The groom is now in the electrical business in Holbrook, where they will make their home. The Republican joins their many other friends in congratulations and best wishes to them. Friday 13 April 1917

Tuesday of this week Miss Kathryn Springer, of this city, and Mr. Sidney Taylor, of Stapleton, Nebr., autoed to McCook where they were married by county judge Colfer, returned to Danbury in the evening. The bride is the accomplished daughter of Mr. And Mrs. Harve Springer and is one of Danbury’s popular young ladies. She having grown to womanhood in this vicinity. The groom is a stranger to us. We extend him a welcoming hand. Friday 20 April 1917

Hesterworth-Wilcox. Miss Lenora Hesterworth and Mr. John S. Wilcox were united in marriage, Rev. A.H. Kunz, O.M.I., of St. Patrick’s church officiating, on Wednesday, April 18, 1917. The bride is the daughter of Mr. And Mrs. Henry Hesterworth, and the groom is the son of Mr. And Mrs. Gerald Wilcox, both of whom live south of this city. The young people are highly esteemed by all who know them. The happy couple left for the east to spend their honeymoon. They will be “at home” to their friends after May 10th, on the F.S. Wilcox farm, southeast of town. The Republican joins their many friends in congratulations and its best wishes for a long and happy life. Friday 20 April 1917

Anton-Crandell. Sunday morning, April 15, 1917, at 6 o’clock, Miss Mabel Anton and Mr. Leonard Crandall were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s mother, Rev. H.C. Seidel, officiating. The bride is the youngest daughter of Mrs. Augusta Anton, has lived here all her life, and is an estimable young lady. The groom is the only son of Mr. And Mrs. A. Crandall, who have lived here for some years. He graduated from the McCook high school last year, and is now in the employ of the Burlington shops as machinist helper, and a fine young man. They will make their home for the present with the bride’s mother. The best wishes of their many friends with whom The Republican joins, are extended to the young couple. Friday 20 April 1917

Last Wednesday at high noon occurred the marriage of Miss Bessie Coulter to Mr. Shirley Cathcart, at the home of the bride south of town. Friday 20 April 1917

McCorkle-Anton. Sunday, April 15, 1917, Miss Mela McCorkle, of Curtis and Mr. Clarence Anton, of this city, were married at the home of the bride, in Curtis. The bride is a young lady greatly esteemed by those who know her. The groom has been employed in the meat market of his uncle, Paul Anton, here for several years. He is a bright, energetic young man. The happy couple will occupy rooms at the home of his aunt, Mrs. Augusta Anton. They have the good wishes of a host of friends with whom The Republican joins. Friday 20 April 1917

Kennedy-Colling. Miss Nellie Kennedy, daughter of Mr. And Mrs. Martin Kennedy, who live north of this city, and Mr. Bernard Colling, of Indianola, were married Tuesday morning, April 17, 1917, at St. Patrick’s church of McCook, Rev. A.H. Kunz, O.M.I., officiating. After the ceremony a breakfast was served the wedding party at the home of the groom’s aunt, Mrs. Charles Benjamin. The happy couple went to Indianola that evening and they will begin housekeeping on a farm a few miles south of that town. The Republican joins with the friends of the young couple in congratulations. Friday 20 April 1917

Married in Church Sunday. Rev. and Mrs. C.M. McCorkle, announce the marriage of their daughter Mela L. to Clarence P. Anton, of McCook, Nebr., on Sunday, April 15, 1917. At home after May 15, at McCook, Nebraska. This marriage was solemnized at the close of the morning church service at the Methodist church by the bride’s father, which was very impressive, and those fortunate enough to be in attendance at the morning preaching service were privileged to witness the ceremony. Miss Mela McCorkle is one of Curtis’ most highly respected and popular young ladies, and blessed with a large circle of friends here and elsewhere. She will be greatly missed in the community, especially as a worker in the Methodist church of which her father is pastor. Ever since Mr. McCorkle’s pastorate here Miss Mela has been pianist and very efficient one at that. Mr. Anton is a resident of McCook and is high spoken of as a young man of integrity and good business qualifications. They will make their home in McCook where the groom is now engaged in business. The Enterprise joins with their host of friends in congratulations and best wishes for a life crowned with blessings, happiness, and prosperity. Curtis Enterprise. Friday 27 April 1917

Ford-Morosic. Wednesday evening, May 2, 1917, Miss Eunice Ford and Mr. F.I. Morosic were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. And Mrs. Ellis Ford, 911 Main Avenue, Rev. A.L. Zink, of the Christian church, officiating, which was followed by a dinner in three courses. The bride is the youngest daughter of Engineer and Mrs. Ellis Ford, has lived here all her life, graduated from the McCook high school and has been teaching since then. The groom is the son of Mr. And Mrs. August Morosic, of Box Elder precinct. He is a successful young farmer and has a home furnished for his bride on a farm about fourteen miles north of this city. They left for their new home the same evening. The happy young couple have the best wishes of many friends with whom The Republican joins. Friday 4 May 1917

Henderson-Galusha. Miss Gene Henderson and Mr. James Galusha were married at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. And Mrs. Wm. Henderson, in Ft. Morgan, Colorado, Wednesday afternoon, Rev. Mr. Patterson, pastor of the Presbyterian church, officiating. Mrs. A. Galusha, Miss Pattie Galusha, mother and sister, and Mrs. Adair Galusha sister-in-law of the groom, and James Henderson, brother of the bride, of this city attended the wedding. The bride is well known here having lived with her parents in this city, and was a general favorite among the younger set. The groom is the son of Mr. And Mrs. A. Galusha, of this city, and is well known to a large circle of friends. He has been employed in the clothing store conducted by his father and brother. A short time ago he purchased a clothing store in Morrill, Nebraska, and began business for himself, and the young couple will make their home in that town. The many friends of the happy couple with whom The Republican joins, extends congratulations and good wishes to them. Friday 4 May 1917

Solomon-Eisenhart. Miss Julia Solomon and Mr. Eugene R. Eisenhart of Culbertson, were married Tuesday evening at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. And Mrs. S.E. Solomon. Both bride and groom are as well known and popular in McCook, where they have lived, as they are in their home town. Following the ceremony, Mrs. A. C. Eisenhart, sister of the bride, and Miss Loraine Solomon served an elegant dinner in five courses. The bride and groom left the same evening on a wedding trip in the east, as far as New York, expecting to be gone for six weeks, and will make their home in Culbertson. The Republican joins their numerous friends in congratulations and best wishes to the young couple. Friday 4 May 1917

A quiet wedding took place in Catholic church in this city last ___day morning, when Francis J. Madden of Indianola, and Lily Wood of Curtis, were united in the holy bonds of matrimony. Father Stricker performed the ceremony. Mr. Madden is one of our prosperous young farmers living north of town and made a host of friends who wish success in life’s future battles. The bride, while of Curtis, is well known here and is highly spoken of by her friends. They will make their home on the Madden farm south of city. Friday 11 May 1917

One of the prettiest weddings of the season occurred Sunday, April 29, 1917, at the home of Mr. And Mrs. Chas. Hull when their daughter, Miss Edna, was united in marriage to Mr. Arthur Weir. Mr. And Mrs. Weir were the recipients of many wedding gifts and are at home to their many friends on the Clyde Logan place. Friday 11 May 1917

Bartley. From The Inter-Ocean. Miss Pearl Jennings, of Bartley, Nebraska, and Mr. W.R. Watson of Yuma, were united in marriage at the Presbyterian manse at 5 o’clock p.m. Tuesday April 10, Rev. W. L. Breckenbridge officiating. We congratulate the young people and wish for them a long and happy married life. Friday 11 May 1917

Lebanon. From The Advertiser. A pretty wedding took place at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. And Mrs. E.S. Moore at 5 o’clock Wednesday evening, when their daughter, Neva, was united in marriage to Ervin Ingram. Mr. And Mrs. Ingram will go to house keeping, shortly, in the J.W. Jolly residence, which they have rented for the summer. Friday 11 May 1917

A very pretty wedding took place at the home of Mrs. Lucy Lyon, Sunday, April 29th, 1917, when her daughter, Bernice Helena, was united in marriage to Mr. Ray Smith. The bride and groom left, for a short honeymoon, to Denver, Colorado. After May 20 they will make their home on a farm near Trenton where they will welcome their many friends. Friday 11 May 1917

Trenton. From The Register. William Lyon and family, of Cambridge, and Harvey Lyon, of McCook, were here over Sunday, in attendance upon the marriage of their sister Bernice to Ray Smith. Friday 11 May 1917

A pretty wedding took place Sunday at the country home of Mr. And Mrs. N. Brehm when their daughter Pauline and Mr. Darrell D. Martin of McCook were married. Mr. And Mrs. Martin received many pretty and useful gifts. They will make their home in McCook, where he is employed in the dray service. Friday 18 May 1917

Craw-Randel. A very quiet but beautiful wedding took place at the Methodist parsonage last Thursday afternoon, when Miss Alma J. Craw, became the wife of J. Walton Randel. The ceremony was solemnized by Rev. J.R. Bucknell and the ring service was used. The bride was gowned in a dainty white dress, while the groom wore a plan gray suit. The bride is the daughter of Mr. And Mrs. E.D. Craw, living southwest of Stratton, and for some time has been working as book keeper in the Commercial Banking Co’s Bank. She was also active in church work and social life, and won many warm friends by her charming personality. The groom is a prosperous farmer of sterling worth. The happy pair were accompanied by Mr. And Mrs. Earl Dodson, and the bridal party drove back to the bride’s home after the ceremony, in the groom’s large touring car. They drove to McCook to their now home on the Willow where the groom has a fine farm. Stratton News. Friday 1 June 1917

Bowen-Jones. A quiet wedding took place at the Congregational parsonage Wednesday evening, June 6, 1917, when Miss Blanche Bowen and Mr. Bryen Q. John were united in marriage, Rev. Louis Hieb officiating. The bride is the daughter of Mr. And Mrs. B.F. Bowen, and was born and lived here all her life. She is a graduate of the McCook high school with the Class of 1909, and it highly respected and esteemed by all who know her. The groom is the son of Mr. And Mrs. J.W. Jones, and has lived in this city and vicinity practically all his life. For the past several years, he has been in the employ of Real & Easterday at the elevator. He is a fine young man of excellent character and habits and both have a host of friends. The best wishes of all are extended to them for a long, happy and prosperous life. Friday 8 June 1917

Flitcraft-Hoffman. A very pretty home wedding took place Wednesday evening, June 6, 1917, at the home of Mr. And Mrs. Ed Flitcraft, two miles west of town, when their daughter, Miss Alta Fern Flitcraft was united to Mr. Henry J. Hoffman, Rev. J.W. Croft, pastor of the Baptist church officiating. The bride is the eldest daughter of Mr. And Mrs. Ed. Flitcraft, and is a very estimable young lady, an active worker in the Baptist church, and religious and musical circles. The groom has been in the employ of the Burlington on this division for several years an engineman. Both young people have lived here practically all their lives and have a wide acquaintance and many friends. Only the relatives of the families were present at the ceremony. The bride and groom left that night for the west, and will stop to visit his parents in Loveland, on their way to California, and expect to be away about a month. The happy young couple have the best wishes of all their friends with whom The Republican joins. Friday 8 June 1917

Toogood-Divine. Wednesday evening, June 6, 1917, Miss Bessie Toogood and Mr. Dallas G. Divine, of this city, were married at the home of the bride’s mother, Mrs. S. Toogood, in Indianola, Rev. C.D. Gearhart, pastor of the Congregational church of that city officiating. The bride has lived practically all her life in Indianola, and popular among her many friends, active in church, and secretary of the County Sunday school association. The groom has been a resident of this city and vicinity for many years. He has been in the automobile business here for a number of years and built up a splendid business, being district agent for the Chalmers, Dodge Bros. and Franklin Automobiles, and has been quite successful in his business. He has a host of friends with whom The Republican joins, in congratulations to him and his bride, and wish them success and happiness in the future. Friday 15 June 1917

Koller-Gillis. Miss Adaline, daughter of Mr. And Mrs. E.S. Koller, who formerly lived here, and a graduate of the McCook high school, was married Saturday at the home of her parents in Denver, to Mr. Mack Gillis, of Chicago. The many friends of the bride in this city, with whom The Republican joins, extends their best wishes to the happy couple. Friday 15 June 1917

Married at Stockville. A marriage license was issued by County Judge E.P. Pyle last Saturday to Lloyd E. Hegenberger, age 24 and Miss Alma E. Wockenfuss, age 19, both of McCook, and they immediately found Rev. Frank Chadwick, who tied the matrimonial knot. The ceremony was held at the M.E. parsonage. Stockville Faber. Friday 29 June 1917

Thompson-Zimmer. Yesterday, Thursday, July 12, Miss Margaret L. Thompson and Mr. John T. Zimmer, of Lincoln, were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. And Mrs. George E. Thompson, in this city, Rev. L.D. Young, pastor of the First Presbyterian church, of Lincoln, officiating, in the presence of members of the families of the contracting parties and a few of their intimate friends. The bride has lived in this city since a small child, graduated from the high school with the class of 1908 and from the University of Nebraska in 1912, and since that has been teaching English in the high schools of Kearney and Fremont. She is a splendid type of the better young American women, and of McCook and the groom is to be congratulated on his winning such a helpmate. The groom graduated from the University of Nebraska in 1910, and the past few years has been employed by the government as entomologist, but in January was engaged by the British government in that profession and sent to Port Moreshy, New Guinea, where he is still located, for which place they left yesterday afternoon, and will stop in California, the Hawaiian Islands, and Sydney, Australia, for short visits expecting to reach their new home in Port Moreshy about September 1. The best wishes of their many friends, with whom The Republican joins, go with the happy young couple to their distant home. Friday 13 July 1917

Ethel Huber Marries. In Sunday’s Denver Post is published a picture of Miss Ethel Huber who was married last week to Mr. Aldan F. Giggal. The bride was born and lived in McCook, until her parents moved to Denver, a few years ago, where Miss Ethel became quite prominent in high school athletics and for that reason has had her picture in the daily and Sunday papers. The bride has many friends in this city, especially among the younger set, who with The Republican, send her best wishes for a long and happy married life. Friday 27 July 1917

Reid-Cook. A very pretty wedding took place at the home of Dr. and Mrs. D.J. Reid, 1104 First Street West, at high noon, Wednesday, July 25, 1917 when their daughter, Miss Muriel, was united in marriage to Mr. William E. Cook, of Culbertson. The ceremony was performed in the living room which had been prettily decorated for the occasion. Mrs. Frank Sullivan, sister of the bride played Mendlesshon’s Wedding March, as the bride and her father came down the stairway, and into the living room, where they were met by the groom. They were attended by Miss Julia Schlagel, as bridesmaid and Edwin Cook, brother of the groom, as groomsman. The Episcopal ring service was used, Rev. H.C. Seidel, pastor of the Methodist church officiating. After the ceremony and the congratulations a bountiful three course dinner was served by the bride’s parents to the wedding party and guests. Thursday morning the happy couple left in their auto for a trip in the mountains of Colorado, after which they will make their home on a farm near Wray, Colorado. The bride is a graduate of the McCook high school with the Class of 1915, and is one of McCook’s most beautiful young ladies. The Republican joins their many friends in congratulations, and best wishes, for a long happy and prosperous life. Friday 27 July 1917

Angell-Charlet. At noon Wednesday, August 1, 1917, Miss May Irene Angell and Edgar Lee Charlet were united in marriage at the Methodist parsonage Rev. H.C. Seidel, officiating. Miss Joy Angell, sister of the bride, and William Jimerson acting bridesmaid and groomsman. They left that afternoon for Denver on their honeymoon trip and will be away for a week. Friday 3 August 1917

Henry Shepherd Marries. Yesterday’s State Journal, of Lincoln states Henry D. Shepherd, of McCook, and Miss Pauline E. Wallace, of University Place, secured a license to marry. Henry graduated from the McCook high school in the class of 1914, and has since been attending the Wesleyan university, preparing for the ministry. His many friends here congratulate him and hope his future will be happy and successful. Friday 3 August 1917

Parker-Hawkins Nuptials. The wedding of Miss Rozella Parker to Mr. Clyde Frank Hawkins was solemnized at the bride’s home Tuesday evening, July 31, at 8 o’clock Rev. Ray S. True officiating. The bride is the daughter of Mr. And Mrs. Samuel Parker, who reside on a farm six miles southwest of Minden. Having been formerly a student in the local high school, she is well know among the social circles of the students. Mr. Hawkins resides south of McCook and is the brother of Miss Sallie Hawkins, one of the teachers of the city schools. The wedding was a quiet unostentatious affair. The bride wore white organdie dress and held a bouquet of bride roses. The groom wore the usual black. The ring ceremony was used. After the wedding refreshments were served. The guests were: Nilo and Harold Parker of Minden; O.W. Parker, of Kewanne, Illinois; Edith Lewis, Harry and Marion Parker, the grandchildren Bertha and Isabell Pflaum, of Elm Creek. Mr. And Mrs. Hawkins will make their home for the present near McCook where they will be at home to their many friends. Minden News Friday 10 August 1917

Indianola. From The Reporter. Miss Fern Hedges daughter of Mr. And Mrs. Clark Hedges, of this place was quietly married on Saturday July 28th, to Mr. Fred Dow, of Chicago, in the First Presbyterian church of that city. Mr. Dow will be remembered as being a former Indianola boy and the son of Mr. And Mrs. C.W. Dow and is now employed by the International Harvester Co., in Chicago, at which place the young couple will make their home for the present. Friday 17 August 1917

A Popular Couple Married. Wednesday Evening at the Home of the Bride in Beaver City. The Payne-Gatewood Wedding. A number of guests from this city were present at the ceremony which was a delightful affair. The wedding ceremony of Miss Bess L. Payne, of Beaver City, and Dr. Robert H. Gatewood, of this city took place at the country home of Mr. And Mrs. Joshua Chitwood, near Beaver City, Wednesday evening August 22, 1917, Rev. Alexander Bryans, pastor of the Methodist church of that city, officiating. Miss Marjorie Schobel, of McCook, sang “At Dawning” just before the ceremony, and played the piano softly during the marriage service. Frances DeMay was the flower girl and preceded the bridal party into the parlor where the ceremony took place. Miss Theresa Gatewood, sister of the groom was bridesmaid and Harold P. Sutton, groomsman. The bride’s dress was white silk tulle over white satin with pearl trimmings, a veil of tulle, in cap effect with wreath of orange blossoms and lilies of the valley and she carried a shower bouquet of roses and lilies of the valley. The bridesmaid’s dress was of green silk tulle over radium cloth and she carried a bouquet of pink roses. The rooms were beautifully decorated in white and green. After congratulation refreshments were served by the bride’s sister, Mrs. C.A. Klepper; Miss Martha Abel presiding at the table. The bride is a daughter of Mrs. Joshua Chitwood, and has been a most successful teacher in the McCook public schools for the past five years, and since the introduction of departmental work, has been the principal of it. She has been popular in school and social circles here, winning friends, always by her pleasing manner and strong personality. The groom is the son of Dr. and Mrs. A.T. Gatewood, of this city. He is a successful dentist who have been located here for several years is popular in social circles, and has a host of friends. The happy couple were accompanied from Beaver City Wednesday evening by a jolly company of friends in autos to Oxford, from where they went to Chicago to spend two weeks. Dr. and Mrs. Gatewood will make their home in this city, where the groom has already a nice bungalow furnished to begin housekeeping. The Republican, with their many friends, wish them a long and happy life. Friday 24 August 1917

Spencer-Carter. Monday evening a very happy and pretty home wedding took place at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. And Mrs. Samuel Spencer, in South McCook, when their daughter, Miss Hazel A. Spencer, was joined in marriage to Mr. Jay W. Carter, Rev. A.I. Zink, of the Christian church officiating. Both young people are deservedly popular with a large circle of friends and acquaintances. The groom is the son of Mr. And Mrs. Alfred Carter, who live east of the city. He has owned and run the retail oil and gasoline wagon here for some time, and has made many friends by courteous and genial ways. They will make their home in South McCook, and The Republican joins their other friends in wishing a happy prosperous life. Friday 24 August 1917

Woolard-Speer Wednesday evening, August 29, 1917, at 8 o’clock, Miss Harriet G. Woolard, daughter of Mr. And Mrs. James Woolard, and Mr. Alexander M. Speer, were united in marriage of St. Alban’s Episcopal church, Rev. H.J. Johnson, the rector, officiating. The wedding was a very quiet one only the relatives of the bride, and a few intimate friends of her and the family were present. Mrs. C.F. Heber acting as bridesmaid and Harry Woolard, brother of the bride, as groomsman. The bride looked very charming attired in a beautiful dress of gray charmeuse and georgetia crepe trimmed in blue and steel beads, gloves and slippers to match, hat of silver lace trimmed in same shades of blue as dress, and she carried a bouquet of sweet peas. The bride has lived here most of her life and has been an employee in the post office for the past ten years. She is very popular with everyone who knows her, and a friend to all and a kind and happy word and smile for everyone she knows, which has won her many friends. The groom has been manager of the McCook Electric Co. since it has been under the present ownership, and is secretary of the Gas and Electric Co. of Denver. He is an expert electrical engineer and has made the McCook plant one of the best in the west. The bride and groom left that evening shortly after the ceremony for Kansas City, on their wedding trip expecting to return in a week. For the present they will occupy rooms in the W.F. Fallick building. The Republican joins with all the friends of this popular couple in best wishes to them for a happy future. Friday 31 August 1917

Dunlap-Cobb. Miss Margaret Dunlap and Mr. David N. Cobb, of this city were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. And Mrs. John Dunlap, in Ulysses, Tuesday morning, August 28, 1917, only the relatives of the contracting parties being present. The bride is known to many here, having taught two terms in the public schools of this city and since then has been teaching in Seattle, Washington, she is a talented young lady and has a large circle of friends here. The groom has been in the employ of the Burlington here for years so the dispatcher’s office and is one of McCook’s most popular young men. The happy couple left on a wedding trip to Chicago and Kansas City expecting to arrive in here next week where they will make their home of 706 Second street East. The Republican extends to the happy couple its best wishes for the future. Friday 31 August 1917

Meyers-Randel. A quiet, pretty home wedding took place Wednesday afternoon, August 29, 1917, at the residence of the bride’s parents, Mr. And Mrs. W.H. Meyers, in Red Willow precinct, when their daughter, Miss Amy C. Meyers was united to Mr. Lester H. Randel, Rev. A.L. Zink, of this city officiating in the presence of the families and relatives of the contracting couple. The young couple are popular in their community, and highly esteemed by all who know them, and have the best wishes for a long and happy life of a host of friends. Friday 31 August 1917

Knipple-Huston. Tuesday morning, Miss Helen Knipple and Mr. Frank J. Huston were united in marriage at the parsonage of St. Patrick’s church, Rev. A.H., O.M.I., officiating in the presence of members of the families of the contracting parties. After the ceremony a three course breakfast was served at the home of the bride’s parents, Mrs. C. Knowles, of Trenton, a sister of the bride, assisting her mother. The bride and groom accompanied by Mrs. Margaret Conley and his nephew Marcus Huston, of Galesburg, Ill., left Tuesday for Colorado Springs, for a short stay and the happy couple intend to go on to their friends after November 1st, in McCook, where they will make their home. The bride is the daughter of Mr. And Mrs. O.M. Knipple and was born and has lived here all her life, and is a most amiable capable young lady. The groom has been employed in the train service of the Burlington on this division for the past several years. The best wishes of a host of friends is extended to the happy couple for their future happiness and success. Friday 7 September 1917

Doyle-Osborn. Miss Lillian Doyle and Mr. M.R. Osborn were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s mother, Mrs. William Doyle, 206 West Second street Sunday morning at 6:30 o’clock Rev. H.J. Johnson, rector of St. Alban’s Episcopal church, officiating only members of the families of the contracting parties being present. After the ceremony a bounteous wedding breakfast was served to those present by the bride’s mother. The bride is a young lady of high character who is greatly esteemed by all who know her, and for several years has been following the profession of nurse, in this city. The groom has lived here practically all his life, and is one of the most popular young men in the city with all classes. He is a member of the progressive shoe firm of Dunbar & Osborn. The couple have the sincere congratulations and good wishes for a happy and prosperous future of everyone who knows them. Friday 21 September 1917

Everts-Rankin. Sunday morning, Miss Laura Everts and Mr. John H. Rankin were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s uncle, Mr. W.B. Whittaker, Rev. A.L. Zink officiating, in the presence of relatives of the young people. Following the ceremony a wedding breakfast was served and the bride and groom left for Denver. The bride has been employed in the Citizens Bank, as stenographer, and the groom is employed as stenographer for the Vulcan Iron Works, in Denver, to which city they have gone to make their home. The best wishes of a host of friends follow them for a happy and prosperous future. Friday 21 September 1917

Hume-Colling. Miss Lela Hume and Leo J. Colling, two popular young people of Indianola, were married at the home of Mrs. Charles Deveny on Saturday, October 132, 1917, Rev. A.L. Zink, officiating. Friday 19 October 1917

Bolles-Quiene. Orlie Bolles, son of Mrs. M. Bolles of Box Elder, a graduate of the McCook public schools in the Class of 1917, was married last week to Miss Lois Quiene, of Superior. The grooms many friends in this city extend to him their congratulation and best wishes to the young couple for a happy and prosperous future. Friday 26 October 1917

Last evening, the quiet wedding of Roy King and Miss Ruby Robinson took place at the Robinson home. Only the sisters and near relatives from Wisconsin being present. The sacred words, that made their lives as one, were spoken by Rev. Boast. The bride is one of the most popular young ladies of Bartley, and has the respect and regards of all who know her. The groom is a good, honest trustworthy young man and a successful farmer. He is a son of M. King, one of Bartley’s substantial farmers and is well like by his fellowmen. Friday 26 October 1917

Menard-Leitner. Yesterday afternoon Miss Aimee Menard was united in marriage to Mr. Frank Leitner, of Pittsburg, Pa., at the parsonage of the Catholic church, Rev. A.H. Kunz, O.M.I., officiating in the presence of a few of the most intimate friends of the bride. Both bride and groom are deaf and dumb. The bride has lived in this city practically all her life, and is a beautiful young lady in person and character, who is very highly esteemed by everyone who knows her. The groom is an auditor in the employ of a large steel corporation in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. They left last night for Pittsburg, where they will make their home. The Republican joins with their many friends in heartiest congratulations and best wishes to the happy couple. Friday 16 November 1917

Rowell-Manso. Miss Grace Rowell and Mr. J.W. Manso, were quietly married Wednesday afternoon, November 28, 1917 at the Congregational parsonage, Rev. Louis Hieb, officiating. The bride has lived here all her life and for the past few years has been clerking in the DeGroff & Co’s store. She has a host of friends and highly esteemed by everyone. The groom is a locomotive fireman of this division of the Burlington and a time fine young man. The Republican joins their many friends in congratulations and best wishes. Friday 30 November 1917

Cruver-Escher. Wednesday, December 12, 1917, Mrs. Cruver and W.F. Escher, of this city were united in marriage at Trenton, returning here that evening, Mrs. M. Ploussard, sister of the groom accompanied the couple to Trenton to witness the ceremony. Friday 21 December 1917

Nothnagel-Downs. Miss Alma L. Nothnagel and Edward Downs, young people living at McCook, were united in marriage by L.Y. Hague, county judge, on Wednesday, December 5, in his office at the court house. Mr. Downs is a brother of Mrs. Wm. Stradler of this city. Mr. And Mrs. Stradler were present at the ceremony. Minden News. Friday 21 December 1917

DEATHS:

Obituary. Alfred H. Bell, was born September 25th, 1839, in Carrol county, Indiana and passed away at his home in Indianola, Nebraska, December 25, 1916, aged 77 years and 3 months. He was married to Miss Amanda J. McCormieg of Carrol county, Indiana, April 4, 1861, to which union three children were born, two of whom Charles Bell, of Salt Lake City, Utah, Mrs. Frank Gage, of Montrose, Colorado, survive him, also, fifteen grandchildren, and nine great-grand children. He enlisted January 4, 1864 in the 46th Indiana Reg. And was mustered out September 3, 1866. In 1881 they moved from Indiana to Muscatine county, Iowa, where he lived until 1889, when he came to this county and two years afterward moved to Indianola where he resided until his death. He leaves many friends to mourn his loss. Card of Thanks. To all our friends, our kind neighbors, the B. of R.T. lodge, and the Ladies Auxiliary of B. of R.T. lodge, who assisted us during the sickness and burial of our beloved mother. Mr. And Mrs. H.W. Wyman; Miss Gail Funk; Mr. Vern Funk. Friday 5 January 1917

Thomas Eber Franklin was born in Warren county, Iowa, in September, 1862, and died in the hospital at McCook, Nebraska, Dec. 25, 1916, from cancer of the stomach. The deceased leaves to mourn his loss, his aged brother, Mrs. Fairbanks, and two sister, Mrs. Downs and Mrs. Bedel, all of Culbertson, Nebraska. Friday 5 January 1917

Leta Bell daughter of Mr. And Mrs. G.W. Hinton, died Monday, December 25th. Death was sudden and unexpected, as she was in apparent good health. She had been sleeping and upon visiting the bedroom, Mrs. Hinton was terribly shocked to find the little one had passed away. Friday 5 January 1917

Mrs. M. King an old and much respected citizen of this precinct, died at her home south of town, about 12 o’clock Saturday night, from an attack of pneumonia, and was buried Tuesday afternoon. The funeral was held at the Christian church, Rev. Gilpin of Indianola officiating. Mrs. King leave her husband and five sons besides several brother and sisters, to mourn her death. The sympathy of the people of this community goes out to the bereaved ones. Friday 5 January 1917

Mrs. Robert Curran Dies. After suffering for many years from asthma, Mrs. Robert Curran died from leakage of the heart at 9:30 o’clock New Year’s morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. H.W. Wyman, with whom she has made her home for several years. Eutherma Katherine Carnohan was born in Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 1851. She was married to Robert Curran at Butler, Pa., in 1876, to which union one child, Mrs. H.W. Wyman, of this city, was born. Mrs. Curran lived in the east all of her life until she came to McCook a few years ago to make her home with her daughter. She seemed in her usual health until Saturday night when she became quite ill suddenly and rapidly grew worse, until the end came Monday morning and relieved her from her suffering. Mrs. Curran was a most estimable lady, but her affliction kept her confined to her home so closely, but few knew her here, and they speak in the highest terms of her. Funeral services were held at the home of her daughter, Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. H.J. Johnson, of St. Alban’s Episcopal church officiating. The family have the sympathy of all in their hour of sorrow. Friday 12 January 1917

Joseph Kunz Dies. Dr. Joseph Kunz, brother of Rev. A.H. Kunz, O.M.I. of this city died Wednesday in Buffalo, N.Y. He had been in ill health for the past two years, and spent the summer and winter of 1915 here with his brother, and came here again last summer, but for the past several months was in Denver. Saturday Father Kunz was called to Denver to accompany his brother to their home in Buffalo, N.Y., as hopes for his recovery had been given up. Father Kunz and his brother passed through here on Monday night on their way home and the young man died while being carried from the train in Buffalo. Friday 12 January 1917

Charles Wellman Shrutleff was born in Genoa, DeKalb county, Illinois, on the 18th day of November, 1857, and died at his home on the 27th day of December, 1916, aged 59 years, 1 month and 9 days. After graduating from the law school he came west and spent a few months in Beatrice, Nebraska, coming from there to Stratton, Nebraska, where he proved up on a homestead and engaged in the banking business. In June 1888, he was joined in marriage with Emma A. Johnson, at Chicago, Ill. Of this union four children were born: Roswell J., Carolyn L., Helen M., and Charles Dana, the latter only living seven months. He returned to the practice of law in 1895 and has actively engaged in this profession since that date. He served the public four years as County Judge and eight years as county attorney. Friday 12 January 1917

Danbury. From The News. After a lingering illness covering a period of over two years, Mrs. S. E. Ruby passed to her final reward last Saturday evening, December 29, 1916, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Harvey Creasman, aged 71 years, 7 months and 27 days. She leaves to mourn her sad demise seven children, three nieces, one nephew, thirty-two grandchildren and a host of friends. The children are namely: Ambros Ruby, Mrs. F. G. Stilgebouer, Mrs. Otto Puelz, Howard Ruby, Mrs. Harvey Creasman, Mrs. C.S. Messener, and John Ruby, all of which were present at her funeral with the exceptio of Mrs. Harvy Creasman who was confined to her bed with illness. Friday 12 January 1917

Obituary. Ethel M. Neville first saw the light of day on April 4, 1885 in Cherokee county, Iowa. Here she grew to womanhood and lived until 1910 when she moved to make her home in McCook, Nebraska. In 1915 she moved to a ranch about 20 miles southwest of the city. She was married on June 1, 1910 to Eugene B. Grigsby. Mrs. Grigsby was converted in 1901 and immediately united with the Methodist Episcopal church of which she was a member until her death. She was also a member and an honored past president of the Ladies society of the B. of L.F. & E. She was of an amiable disposition and had the faculty of making friends of whom she had many. For some time Mrs. Grigsby had been unwell though she went about her usual work until on Friday, January 5, when she was taken to the hospital in the hope that an operation would relieve her. On Wednesday morning, early, January 10, 1917 she awoke to be with her Christ. She leaves besides her husband, her mother, two brothers and four sisters. Brief services were held on Wednesday evening, January 10, conducted by the Rev. H.C. Siedel, her pastor, the Methodist church choir furnishing the music. On Thursday morning the body was taken to the former home of the deceased to be interred at Aurelia, Iowa. Friday 12 January 1917

W.P. Burns Dies. After an illness from leakage of the heart for about two years during which time he gradually failed, William P. Burns died at his home, 509 4th Street East, Tuesday, January 16, 1917. Obituary. William Parker Burns was born at Moran, Pennsylvania, February 25th, 1845 and died at McCook, Nebraska, January 16th, 1917. When a lad nine years old he came to the state of Illinois with his parents who settled near LaFayette. Was educated in the common schools of that state where he grew to manhood in the occupation of a farmer. He enlisted and served in Co. “C” 3rd Regt. Ill., Inft. Col., until October 16th, 1865, when he was mustered out of the service with a record of honorable service. He was married to Mary J. Downs at West Jersey, Ill., June 27th, 1870. To this union four children were born Rose Ann, Lilly, Ada and Hattie, three of these have passed on before and await his coming. Mrs. Burns, Hattie, six grand-children, and several brothers and sisters of the deceased remain to mourn his loss. In 1880 the deceased moved with his family from the state of Illinois to Red Willow County, and settled on a farm seven miles east of this city where they lived until about nine years ago when he moved to this city where the family now resides. In life the deceased was a robust, energetic manly man, a kind husband, and father, beloved by his neighbors and esteemed by all who knew him. May his soul rest in peace. The funeral services will be held in the Methodist church this afternoon and his body interred in the Old Soldiers plot of Riverview cemetery. Friday 19 January 1917

Miss Wescott Dies. Miss Susan E. Wescott died Monday, January 15, 1917, at the home of her niece, Mrs. Joshua Rowland in Grant precinct, after an illness of two weeks, the immediate cause of her death being heart failure resulting from her illness. Miss Susan Elizabeth Wescott was born at Sackett Harbor, New York, March 15, 1839. She was educated at the New York institute for deaf mutes, in New York City. When her sister and husband, Mr. And Mrs. O. L. Thompson, moved to Wyoming, Iowa, in 1869, she came west with them and made her home with them. Later they came to Beatrice, and in September, 1892, they moved to this county. Her sister, Mrs. Thompson died in 1893, at Beatrice, leaving four small children, and the rest of her life has been faithfully and unselfishly devoted to them, she could not have been more of a mother to them had they been her own, and the children, now grown to manhood and womanhood with families of their own, fully appreciate, and she continued her devotion to her charges by much care of their children. She came with her brother-in-law and family to Red Willow county about twenty-four years ago. Though deaf and dumb, her affliction did not interfere with making friends with all whom she came in contact, her bright, cheerful way and helpful sympathy won the respect and friendship of everyone who knew her, and her passing away will be mourned by many more than her kindred. She lived a useful and happy life to a ripe old age. She was the last of her family to go but leaves three nephews and one niece, children of her sister, Fred, Don and Frank Thompson, and Mrs. Joshua Rowland, all of whom, except Frank were here to attend the funeral. The funeral services were held at the home of Mr. And Mrs. Joshua Rowland, Wednesday afternoon, Rev. H.C. Seidel of this city officiating, and her body was laid to rest in Longview cemetery. Friday 19 January 1917

Ray Trouts Tragic Death. Monday afternoon this community was startled and shocked to hear of the tragic death of Raymond Trout, son of Mr. And Mrs. Henry Trout, at their home on 3rd street west, between four and five o’clock. Raymond came home from school at the usual time and was in his happy manner says his father to The Republican, his mother told him not to go away shortly after he said he would go out and do his evening chores. About half past four the father asked where they boy was and was told he was doing the evening chores. In a few minutes as he was not seen and did not answer when called, the parents went out to look for him. The mother going to the barn hearing a noise in the hay loft and seeing dust falling through cracks went up and found the little fellow unconscious his arms clasped around a bundle of hay, and a rope caught under his chin in such a manner as to choke him. In her fright she was too weak to lift him and she ran to the house to get a knife and returned to cut the rope. A neighbor boy, assisted her in getting him into the house. He was still alive and a physician was phoned for. He opened his eyes after he was laid down in the house drank some water but died before the doctor arrived. The death of the little boy is most sad and the heart broken parents and his sisters have the utmost sympathy of every one in their city. Funeral services were held in the Methodist Church, Wednesday afternoon. Rev. Mr. Sattler, of the German church, officiated assisted by Rev. H.C. Seidel and were largely attended. The fifth grade of the West Ward school of which he was a member, attending in a body, and the casket was literally covered with flowers. Short services in German and English were given by the ministers, Mrs. Sattler and Miss Elizabeth Krieger sang a duet in German and the Methodist choir sang two hymns in English. His remains were buried in Longview cemetery. Raymond Trout was born in this city January 9, 1907 and was the only son of Mr. And Mrs. Henry Trout. Besides the parents he has left four sisters, Mabel, Helen, Alice and Irma, to mourn his sudden and tragic death. Card of Thanks. We extend our heartfelt thanks to everyone for the kind sympathy and assistance given to us in our overwhelming sorrow, and for the beautiful flowers sent to the funeral of our little son and brother. Mr. And Mrs. Henry Trout and family. Friday 25 January 1917

Mrs. Alfred Mosley, who has been ill at her home in Culbertson for sometime, died last Sunday. The funeral was held Tuesday. Interment in Culbertson cemetery. Friday 2 February 1917

Peter Nelson Dies. Word was received here yesterday morning that Peter Nelson, who has been a resident of this city the past few years, and for many years a resident of this county, died at Fort Pierce, Florida, where he and his wife had gone to spend the winter, in hopes the change of climate might be beneficial to his health, which had been failing for some time before his departure for there. His body will be brought to McCook for burial. Friday 12 February 1917

Obituary. Peter Nelson was born in the state of Ohio on December 10, 1848. When a lad of 17 years he went with his parents to Missouri where he lived until 1874 when he moved to Iowa. About 18 years later he came to Nebraska, and settled near Blue Hill, in Webster County, from where he came to McCook in 1910 to make his home. He was married in 1871 to Miss Emaline Reeves and he was the father of eight children, one of whom, Mrs. Maud B. Erwin, passed to Eternity. In 1914 he was converted and united with the Methodist church of McCook, of which he was a member at the time of his death. Mr. Nelson had not been well for some time and last Fall went to Florida where he hoped to recuperate his health. Nothing serious was anticipated, however, until an apparently slight cold developed into bad complications and on Thursday, February 8, 1917, he fell to sleep. He was a little over 68 years of age. He is survived by his widow, four sons, Chas.. W., and W.E. Nelson, of Culbertson, Jno. R. Nelson, of Bartley, and Jacob Nelson, of Broughton, Kan, three daughters, Sarah J. Leetsch, of Blue Hill, Bertha M. James, of Bladen, and Francis Harrison, of McCook, thirty-one grandchildren, one great-grandchild, six sisters and seven brothers. Funeral services were held at the Methodist church on Tuesday afternoon, February 13, 1917, conducted by the Rev. H.C. Seidel. Music was furnished by the church choir. Interment was in the Longview cemetery. Friday 19 February 1917

Bert Hall Dies Suddenly. After an illness of but a day Albert L. Hall, died at his home in this city Monday afternoon February 12, 1917. Bert Hall has been in the employ of the Burlington here for the past eight years, and was respected and popular with all his fellow workmen. Agent Bash says of him: “In the four years I have been here he has not personally used a pass nor taken a layoff, he was always on time, or a little before; Bert handled all the mail sacks on the night trains, eight of them, and I do not remember of him having missed sending a sack and when ever there was a sack short or one miscarried or any other error that occurred in his line while he was on duty, I always found a note on my desk in the morning telling me of it. I never during these four years had to call his attention to any duty he had neglected. He was the most faithful and reliable man I had work under me, and do not believe I will ever have another so good.” That tells the story of Bert’s life better than we can. Thought, in a humble position, he filled it well, and leaves a record of faithfulness, his widow and children may well be proud of: He was off duty but one night in four years--the night before he died. Albert Leslie Hall was born in Indianola, Iowa, August 4, 1861, and lived there until 1892, when he moved to McCook, where he has since lived. He was married to Miss Retta M. Method, on November 28, 1894, and he was the father of two children. He was a member of the Woodman of The World. Naturally of a retiring disposition Mr. Hall followed his daily vocations with a precision that speaks well of his faithfulness to his duties, On Sunday morning in returning from his work he complained of an ill feeling, and that night did not go to his employment. On Monday he seemed better, but immediately after dinner, without warning, he suddenly became worse and before help could arrive he had passed to Eternity. He leaves besides his widow, his two children, Mrs. Everett King and Miss Nora Hall, two grandchildren, and one brother. Funeral services were held at the Methodist church on Wednesday afternoon, February 14, 1917, conducted by Rev. H.C. Seidel, the music being furnished by the church choir. Interment was in Riverview cemetery. Friday 19 February 1917

Frank Becker passed away at his home, north of town, Wednesday, February 14, at a ripe old age. He was preceded to that great beyond by his lifelong companion just a week ago. Friday 23 February 1917

A.W. Campbell Dies. Alexander W. Campbell, who moved to Box Elder precinct, in this county, in 1878, died at Ingleside, Nebraska, February 15, 1917, and the remains taken to Box Elder and buried in the cemetery at that place Sunday afternoon. The following obituary was given us for publication: A.W. Campbell was born in Rome county, Tennessee, August 22, 1831, and died at Ingleside, Nebr. Febr. 15, 1917, aged 85 years, 5 months, and 23 days. June 24th, 1852, he was united in marriage to Nancy Johnson who 16 years ago preceded him to the Spirit Land. To this union were born 12 children, of which eight remain to mourn his departure, J.L. and T.M. Campbell, and Hattie Wilson of McCook, Nebr. R.S. Campbell of Tobias, Nebr., G.F. Campbell of Brawley, Ark., Susie Hough, Billings, Mont, Sadie Richey, Los Angeles, Calif. And Nellie Brown McKinley, Oreg. Four were present. Living in the south in the days of slavery and on the midst of the trying times previous to and during the War of the Rebellion, he remained loyal to the Union. Although conscripted by the Confederates, soon as he could he went to the Union Army, but was advised not to join as it would be certain death if he were captured by the enemy. He remained and worked with the Union Army but was advised not to join as it would be certain death if he were captured by the enemy. He remained and worked with the Union Army, until 1863 when he was ordered to return home and given transportation to the North by the government. He with his wife and children, settled in Washington county, Iowa, where he lived until 1875, when he moved to Saline county, Nebr., and three years later in 1878, he came to Red Willow county, and took a homestead where he has since lived. Grandpa Campbell was converted in early manhood and united with the Methodist church of which he has remained a consistent member. Friday 23 February 1917

Oley Clyde Hixon was born June 21, 1885, in Hamilton county, Nebraska; came to Chase county in 1893, where he grew to manhood; was married to Jennie Lee in February, 1908. To this union were born five children, two dying in infancy. He died February 7, 1917, aged 31 years, 7 months and 17 days. He leaves to mourn his untimely death, a wife, three children, father, mother, one sister and four brothers besides a host of friends. Friday 23 February 1917

D.C. McCallum Dies. D.C. McCallum, of Wauneta, father of Mrs. Barney Hofer, of this city, died at his home Wednesday evening, after a long illness, aged 83 years. Mr. McCallum has been a resident of Hayes and Chase county for thirty-two years, homesteading in Hayes County and for the past twenty years a merchant in Wauneta and at the time of his death was president of the Peoples Bank, and has been one of the most prominent citizens of his county and widely known over the state. His family have the sympathy of everyone in their sorrow. The funeral services will be held at Wauneta this afternoon. Friday 23 February 1917

Thomas C. Runyan was born near Bowling Green, Ohio, and died in Imperial, Nebraska, February 10, 1917, aged 72 years. Mr. Runyan came to Nebraska in 1894 and homesteaded in Chase county a few miles north of Imperial, where he has since lived. Mr. Runyan has lived a life of celibacy. He leaves to mourn, two sisters and one brother, Mrs. M.A. Bigler, of Beatrice, Nebraska and Mrs. Elizabeth Rizer, of Bowling Green, Ohio; and Joel Runyan of Imperial. Friday 23 February 1917

Mrs. J.B. Russell died at her home in Fremont, Sunday, February 1, 1917, and was brought to Indianola for burial Monday evening. Funeral services took place at the Catholic church in Indianola at 10 a.m. Tuesday and interment made in the Catholic cemetery. Bessie Grandola Vandervort was born in Adams county, Nebraska, December 1890. She moved with her parents to Indianola in childhood, spending most of her young life in this vicinity. April 9, 1906 she was married to J.B. Russell at Oberlin, Kans. To this union four children were born, two of which preceded her to the better world. Friday 23 February 1917

After a lingering illness of several weeks during which she was able to be up a part of the time, Grandma Furman passed away at 6:30 o’clock, last Wednesday evening, the cause of her death being bronchitis. Wanda Jane Campbell was born near Mehoopany, Wyoming Co., Penna., on Febr. 12, 1847, died at her home in Marion, Nebr., Febr. 14, 1917, aged 70 years and two days. She was married to Granville S. Furman at Mehoopany, Pa., on Nov. 10, 1866. To this union three sons and one daughter were born. The golden wedding was celebrated last November and the happy old couple counted seventeen grandchildren without the loss of a single child or grandchild. Grandma’s passing marks the first broken link in the chain. In 1879 Mrs. Furman and the four children came to Mitchell county, Kan., Mr. Furman having preceded her a year or so, and after a few months the family moved to Decatur Co., and settled near were Marion now stands and that was their home for 31 years before they moved to Marion. Grandma Furman reached her “three score years and ten” Monday, but was to ill to celebrate the event. She has been making a heroic fight for life and the past week, but it will be a miracle if she comes out victorious. Grandma Furman Dies. Thursday morning, Mother died at 6:30 last evening. The funeral will probably be held at 1:30 tomorrow. Burial at Danbury cemetery. Friday 2 March 1917

Irvin Clarence Bortner was born in Nuckolls county, Nebraska, on January 7, 1897. Later he moved to St. Ann., Frontier county with his parents which place was his home at the time of his decease. About three years ago he had a fall from the effects of which he never seemed to have recovered. On Sunday afternoon, almost without warning he was taken severely ill and though every help was given him he never recovered and on Wednesday March 7, 1917 his spirit passed to God who gave it. Irvin is survived by his father and mother, five brothers and two sisters. Funeral services were held at the home of his parents on Thursday afternoon March 8, 1917 conducted by the Rev. H.C. Seidel, of McCook. Interment was made in the Longview cemetery. Friday 9 March 1917

Floyd Edwards took Lee Marks to McCook last Tuesday to the hospital for an operation for appendicitis. Later Lee Marks died at McCook Saturday morning from affects of operation at the General hospital in McCook. Aged 18 years. We extend our sympathy to the sorrowing father, mother and brother. Friday 16 March 1917

Danbury. From The News. Diptheria, one of the most dreaded of all diseases, has made its appearance in our community. At the Oscar Miller home a few miles south of Danbury, three deaths have already resulted from it. Friday night the youngest child died, and Sunday night the fourteen year old daughter passed away, to be followed in a few hours by the mother. The father and one other child lay in a critical condition for days, but latest reports are to the effect that there is some improvement. Many of the neighbor women had volunteered to care for the sick, and were quarantined in with the family. What was first thought to be scarlet fever combined with diptheria broke out in the Oscar Miller family, being on the old Playford place, southeast of Danbury last week. Later the malady was called back diptheria. Their eighteen months old baby, Catherine Louis, was the first victim of the disease, dying last Saturday morning. The elder sister Naomi Ruth, died the next night at 10 o’clock, aged 14 years, and the mother, Mrs. Maude (Schrup) Miller followed at 1 o’clock Monday morning making three deaths in the family in three days. The bodies were hurriedly buried in Sherman cemetery without any funeral services on account of the fear of spreading the dread disease. The four remaining children have the disease, but hopes are entertained for their recovery. Friday 16 March 1917

Geo. Neubauer Dies. Word was received here Tuesday by the Neubauer boys that their brother, George, who formerly lived here for several years, died at the home of their parents in Hildreth, that morning. They left that day to attend the funeral. Friday 16 March 1917

Two more deaths have occurred in the O. Miller family southeast of Danbury, since our last report, making a total of five including the wife and mother. The last victims of the diptheria plague were the twin daughters, Amanda and Armanda, age about seven years, who died Friday and Saturday. Friday 23 March 1917

George W. Dillon Dies. Another old soldier, a veteran of the civil war has passed away. Wednesday morning, March 28, 1917, George W. Dillon died in the Co-operative hospital where he had been taken the evening before, from his home in South McCook, that he might have the benefit of professional care. He has been failing in health for some time and his condition was very serious at the time he was taken to the hospital. He has been a resident of this city for many years and a prominent and active member of the G.A.R. Post. He is survived by a wife and several children. Funeral services will be held in the Christian church this afternoon and his remains buried in Riverview cemetery. Friday 30 March 1917

Baby Simmerman Dies. After a long illness, Raymond, the little son of Mr. And Mrs. Charles Simmerman, died at 8 o’clock Wednesday evening, aged two years. About a year ago the little one had pneumonia and before he had recovered from his sickness had the measles. He had never been well since and about a week before his death an operation was performed upon him with the hope it would save his life, and assist in his recovery. Funeral services were held at the home of E. Mitchell, yesterday afternoon, and the body buried in Riverview cemetery. The sympathy of everyone is extended to the bereaved parents. Friday 30 March 1917

J.H. Yarger Dies. John Henry Yarger first saw the light of day on November 20th, 1840 in Hartleton, Union County, Pennsylvania. When but a mere lad his parents moved to Flat Rock, Ohio, where he grew to manhood. In 1879 he moved to Kansas City, Missouri, from where he came in 1884 to Nebraska and settled in McCook which remained his home until his decease. He was married on January 9, 1873, to Mary E. Patterson, who in 1914, passed to her eternal home. He was the father of three children. Mr. Yarger was a Union soldier of no mean repute. He enlisted in Co. K, 49th Ohio Volunteers, Infantry, in 1861, and was made Corporal, Sergeant, and Commissary Sergeant in succession. After more than four years of service he was discharged but immediately reenlisted and for nearly a year served as first Lieutenant, commanding Co. G of the same regiment. He was honorably discharged in November 1865. In early life Mr. Yarger was converted and at once united with the Methodist Episcopal church. When he came to McCook he identified himself with Christian people and was one of the charter members of the Methodist church of this city. He never servered his membership. He always took an active part so long as he was able and when his condition forbad further participation he greatly grieved. He was hard working, earnest, devoted husband, father, friend and Christian. In 1917 he suffered a stroke of paralysis which practically made him a helpless invalid. Gradually life slipped away and on Sunday afternoon, March 25, 1917, he passed through the portals into his eternal home. He leaves one son, Oscar of Boulder, Colorado, two daughters, Mrs. A.F. Clark and Mrs. H.D. Stewart of McCook, six grandchildren, two brothers and three sisters. Funeral services were held on Wednesday afternoon, March 28, 1917 at the Methodist church conducted by the pastor. The church choir furnished the music. Interment was at Longview. Friday 30 March 1917

The little baby girl of Mr. And Mrs. J.T. Farrell passed away Sunday after a few weeks tussel with the scarlet fever, and was buried Tuesday in the cemetery at Indianola. Friday 6 April 1917

Little Lucile Arnold, daughter, of Mr. And Mrs. Samuel Arnold, died at their home in Culbertson, April 3, 1917, age five months and six days. The remains were taken to McCook for burial Wednesday morning. Friday 13 April 1917

Grandma Conover Dies. When the eyes of Mrs. Peter Conover, known as Grandma Conover, closed in death at her home in this city last evening, the earthly career of a grand old Christian lady, who was known and loved by all, came to a close, and the quiet, patient suffering which she had endured for the past six weeks was ended. Grandma Conover was 80 years, 4 months and 7 days of age and had been a resident of this county for many years. Red Cloud Advertiser. Friday 13 April 1917

M.J. Clark Called to Rest. After a long illness M.J. Clark, of this city, peacefully passed away at his home on East B Street, Wednesday night, at 11:15, surrounded by all his family. Monroe J. Clark was born in Livingston county, New York, July 3, 1830; he moved then to Bremer county, Iowa, in 1864, and was married there to Miss Mary Harris on March 24, 1867, in which union three children were born; one daughter, died in infancy, the others, Mrs. B.F. Bowen and Abner Clark, four grandchildren and a brother survive him. All reside in McCook. Mr. Clark has always been popular with all who knew him, his general happy way and street integrity making him friends of all those he came in contact with His brother, Sencca S. Clark, only survivor of a family of seven children, has made his home here with Mr. And Mrs. Clark for the past twelve years, and the man were greatly attached to each other. The funeral services will be held at his late home, 405 East B Street, tomorrow, Saturday afternoon, at 2:30 o’clock, Rev. Louis Hieb, of the Congregational church, will conduct the services. The family have the sympathy of the many friends in the loss of a kind loving father, husband and brother. Friday 13 April 1917

Perry Gassaway Dies From Injuries Received While Oiling His Engine in McCook Yards Sunday Morning. A sad and fatal accident occurred in the Burlington railroad yards here Sunday morning about 10:15, when Engineer Perry Gassaway was so seriously injured that he died a few hours afterward. The unfortunate man had taken his engine out and coupled on to the front end of an extra east bound. He was on the side rod oiling the engine while the train was still being made up, a string of cars run down against those coupled to the engine and moved that section some distance. Engineer Gassaway’s feet were caught between the driving rod and wheel, his legs were drawn between them and horribly mangled. He was released with difficulty as quickly as possible and taken to the Cooperative hospital, where he died that evening. Perry Gassaway was born in Logan county, Illinois, May 25, 1880. His parents moved to Phelps county, near Holdrege in 1885. He began working for the Burlington about fourteen years ago running out of Hastings, Red Cloud and Oxford, until about three years ago when he was transferred here. Funeral services were held at his late home, Tuesday afternoon, Rev. A.L. Zink, pastor of the Christian church, of which the deceased was a member, officiating, and were attended by the B. of L.E. order in a body, and a large number of friends. The profusion of beautiful flowers and floral emblems testified as to his popularity among his fellow workman. The body was taken to Hastings that afternoon, on No. 10, for burial, accompanied by his widow. An escort from the B. of L.E. and some friends of Mrs. Gassaway. The bereaved wife has the heartfelt sympathy of the whole community in her sorrow. Friday 13 April 1917

The infant daughter of Mr. And Mrs. E.J. Smith died Sunday evening of a complication of diseases. The funeral services were held at the home Tuesday afternoon and the little one laid to rest in the Sherman chapel cemetery. Friday 20 April 1917

Man Burned to Death. Wednesday morning two motor trucks, being shipped on a flat car, on train 77A was discovered on fire just after passing Bartley, and the train stopped and backed to the water tank at Bartley and the fire extinguished, but not until one of the trucks was entirely destroyed and the other nearly so. It was then discovered a man’s body, lying in the debris of one of the trucks, burned beyond recognition. The car and its grewsome freight were brought to McCook and set out here. There was nothing left on the remains of the unfortunate man to give the least clue to his identity. His remains were buried here the next day. Friday 20 April 1917

Culbertson. From The Banner. George Wacker, Sr., last Friday afternoon, passed quietly away while sleeping at the home of his son, Jacob Wacker, where he had been visiting for a short time, age 84 years, 2 months and 18 days, from old age. Friday 23 April 1917

W.H. Cooper Dies. W.H. Cooper, who had been sick for a long time, died at his home about ten miles southeast of this city Saturday afternoon, April 21, 1917. Mr. Cooper was born September 22, 1850, in England. His parents moved to this country and settled in Illinois in 1853, moving to Kansas in 1874. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Lang in 1872, to which union seven children were born, two of whom died in infancy. He moved to Red Willow county in 1880, and has lived here ever since. His last illness was of about five months duration during which time he gradually failed despite everything physicians could do for him until the end came. He is survived by his wife, four sons, a daughter, seventeen grand-children, his mother, a brother, and three sisters. The funeral services were held at his late home ten miles southeast of McCook, Monday afternoon, Rev. H.C. Seidel, officiating, and his body interred in Longview cemetery in this city. Friday 27 April 1917

Baby Dies. Saturday morning, April 21, 1917, Laura May, daughter of Mr. And Mrs. Daniel McFarland, of South McCook, aged two years, died from a complication of diseases following an attack of measles. The family has but lately moved to this city. The funeral services were held Monday in St. Patrick’s church, Father A.H. Kunz, O.M.I. Officiating and the body buried in Calvary cemetery. The sorrowing parents have the sympathy of the community. Friday 27 April 1917

Mrs. Peter Hansen Dies. Mrs. Peter Hansen, of Quick, Frontier county, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. H.J. Pratt, in this city, Tuesday morning, May 1, 1917, where she was brought a few weeks ago to receive treatment for paralysis. The body was taken to her late home in Quick where funeral services were held yesterday afternoon, Rev. H.C. Seidel, of this city officiating, and her remains buried in the cemetery there. Deceased was born in Denmark, and was 72 years of age. The family have the sympathy of all friends and neighbors in their sorrow. Friday 4 May 1917

Sarah E. Madison was born in the state of Pennsylvania in the first day of April, 1839. She passed away at her home in Indianola, Nebr., at 5:30 a.m. Wednesday, April 18, 1917, being at the time of her decease, 78 years, 17 days old. She was married to L.B. Korn, April 15, 1865, on the Indian reservation at Genoa, Nebr., last Sunday, April 15, being their 52 wedding anniversary. To this union were born five children, four boys and one girl. Two of the boys died several years ago. Carl of Indianola, Roscoe, of Houston, Texas, and Mrs. E.C. Wallin of Southfork, Mo., remain to mourn the loss of mother. She also leaves a husband and companion of many years, grandchildren and one brother, Mrs. Korn was among the first, if not the very first of white women to reside in Red Willow County. Mr. And Mrs. Korn homesteaded near Indianola, in 1872. She was a faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Indianola and with her going there passes away the last charter member of this church. Friday 4 May 1917

Mrs. Cynthia McConnell Dies. Mrs. Cynthia McConnell, mother of L.W. and Charles McConnell, who has been an invalid for some time, and unable to walk as the result of a fall, over a year ago, died Friday night at the home of her son, Charles. Obituary. Cynthia Ann Rew was born on April 6, 1832, at Beardstown, Illinois, where she grew to womanhood. In 1874 she moved to Virginia, Illinois, where she lived until 1905, when she went to Loveland, Colorado. Here she remained but one year, when she came to make her home with her son, Charles, in McCook. She was married on September 4, 1855 to David James McConnell, who, in 1906, preceded her to Eternity. She was the mother of four children. “Grandma” McConnell, as she was familiarly known to all, was converted under the preaching of the famous pioneer preacher, Peter Cartright, in 1864 and at once united herself with the Methodist church of which she was a faithful and true member to her last moments. An accident a few years ago deprived her of many of the enjoyments that might have been hers, but she was ever anxious to attend the services of her house of God, whither she would be taken in her wheeled chair. Her sickness which culminated in her decease was of short duration, she being present at church the Sunday before her death and the end came rapidly as it did peacefully. Friday evening, April 27, 1917, when Mrs. McConnell went to her long home, there ended a life useful for God in its devotion to those whom God had given her. She is survived by her four children, L.W. and Charles McConnell, of McCook, Mrs. Lucy E. Crum, of Redland, California and Mrs. Sadie Riley, of Kansas City, Missouri, two grandchildren, and one great-grandchild. The funeral services were held at the resident of her son, Charles, on 2nd Street East, on Saturday afternoon, April 28, conducted by her pastor, the Rev. H.C. Seidel, the church choir furnishing the music. On Sunday morning the remains were taken to Virginia, Illinois, where interment took place on Monday afternoon. Friday 4 May 1917

Obituary. Bodel Maria Anderson was born in Denmark, March 13, 1845. She came to America in 1883, settling at Hastings, Nebraska, from where she moved with her family in 1886 to Frontier County. This remained her home until she died. She was married to Peter Hansen on July 28, 1866. She was the mother of fourteen children eight of whom preceded her to Eternity. Mrs. Hansen was baptized and confirmed in the Lutheran church of which she was a member all her life. She was sick about five weeks and died on Tuesday morning, May 1, 1917, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. H. J. Pratt, in McCook. She is survived by four sons, two daughters, twenty-two grandchildren and 6 great grandchildren. Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon from the farm home near Garden Prairie conducted by the Rev. H.C. Seidel, of McCook. Interment was in the Garden Prairie cemetery. Card of Thanks. We wish to acknowledge with heartfelt thanks the many kind acts and the assistance of our friends during the illness and death of our wife and mother, Mrs. Peter Hansen, and the beautiful flowers sent for the funeral. Mrs. H.J. Pratt and family. Peter Hansen and family. Friday 11 May 1917

Brought Here for Burial. Mrs. George Henderson, a sister of Alfred Carter, of this city, died at her home near Tully, Kansas, Monday, May 14, 1917. Her body was brought to this city Wednesday and buried in Longview cemetery. Funeral services were held in the Pade undertaking parlors conducted by W.B. Mills, of the Christian Science society of this city. The deceased is survived by a husband, three children, one brother and three sisters. Friday 18 May 1917

Bartley. From The Inter-Ocean. Mrs. Christina McLennan died at her home Friday morning, May 4, at 1:30 after an illness dating back to last summer. She was married to George B. McLennan, March 9, 1872 their wedded life being a little more than 45 years. To this union was born two sons, John McLennan of Minneapolis, Minn., and Charles McLennan, of Wayne, and two daughters, Mrs. Adella Book, of Lebanon and Mrs. Katherine Brothers, of Denver, Colo., all of them having their birthplace in Henry county, Ill. Friday 18 May 1917

Trenton. From The Register. Francis Marion Thomas was born in Rushville, Rush county, Indiana, May 24, 1831 and passed from this earthly life to a home beyond, May 3, 1917, at the age of 86 years. In 1851 he was united in marriage to Miss Annie Bishop, of Albia, Iowa, who died in 1888. Five children were born to this union. In the spring of 1895 he moved with his son, Ira and daughter, May, to Trenton, where he has made his home since that time. Friday 23 May 1917

It is with regret that we are called upon to chronicle the sad and utterly no expected death of Robt. W. Green of this city, which occurred at the home of his son, M.W. Green, three and a half miles north of Danbury, on New Years Day where he, with his family went to spend a joyous holiday. Robt. W. Green was born in Whiteside county, Ill., October 14, 1850; departed this life January 1, 1917, at the age of 66 years, 2 months and 18 days. When 19 years of age he moved with his parents from Illinois to Saline county, Nebr., at which place he was united in marriage to Isabel Roberts in 1876. In 1899 the family came to Red Willow county and took up their residence where they have since resided. Five children were born to bless their home, all of whom with the mother, were present at the time of his death. They are: Mayo W., of this place, Leola Burgess and Hallie Clute, of Colorado Springs, Colo., and Helen and Mary Belle who live at home. He also leaves two brothers and two sisters namely: Preston Green of Lebanon, Colo., Clark Green of Montrose, Colo., Mary Stearms, of Monument, Colo., and Mrs. Alice Adkins of Oberlin, Kansas. The brothers were unable to attend the funeral. Friday 1 June 1917

Bartley, From The Inter-Ocean. Leonard Harsch, a long time resident of this county, died at his home southwest of Bartley, last Thursday, May 17th, at the age of sixty-four years. Mr. Harsch had been sick for some time from a complication of diseases, but, we learn, his condition was not considered dangerous until the past few weeks. He was buried Saturday in the German Lutheran cemetery southwest of town. Friday 1 June 1917

Mrs. Sarah E. Rittenburg died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. E.E. Blackson, in Bartley, Tuesday evening of heart failure, at the age of 91 years. Death came quickly and peacefully to her as she sat at the supper table, about 5:30 eating strawberries and a slice of bread and butter. Friday 1 June 1917

Mrs. Margaret Turpine died Sunday morning at the home of her son, Ira Turpin, at Curtis, aged 74 years. The funeral was held Tuesday. Friday 1 June 1917

Leonard Harsch was born April 14, 1853, at Hoffnustall, South Russia, and died at his home six miles southwest of Bartley at 10:30 p.m., Wednesday, May 16, 1917, aged 64 years 1 month and 2 days. His death was caused by intestinal troubles. He was married to Miss Charlotte Fritz in November, 1877, at Hoffnustall. She died in April 1908. In 1911 he was married to Mrs. Elizabeth Serr, who died in November 1915. Mr. Harsch was the father of sixteen children thirteen of whom are living. Mr. Harsch came, with his family from Russia in 1890 and settled in Red Willow county, where he resided on a farm until his death. Friday 8 June 1917

Sarah Elizabeth Greenman was born in Canada West, near the city of Hamilton, March 10th, 1826. She was married to James E. Rittenburg, January 6th, 1867. Six children were born to this union, four sons and two daughters. Two sons died in childhood. Those living are Ellen Blackson, Linnie Williams, and Oscar V. Rittenburg, all of Bartley, and Wm. Of near Curtis. The family moved to Mercer County, Illinois, in 1850 then to Carroll county Missouri in 1867 and to Nebraska in 1885 homesteading the farm where their son Oscar V., now resides. She died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ellen Blackson, in Bartley, May 22nd, 1917, aged 91 years, 8 months and 12 days. Friday 8 June 1917

After a brief illness, covering but a few short days, Lewis G. Van Buskirk passed to the world beyond at one o’clock Tuesday morning following a severe attack of pneumonia. Lewis George VanBuskirk was born in Culbertson, Nebraska, August 17, 1881. Shortly after he moved with his parents to a farm near Benkelman. After coming of age he went to Greeley, Colorado, where he lived for about five years. On December 21, 1904 he was united in marriage with Miss Mabel Dorothy Smith of Greeley, Colorado. Shortly afterwards, they moved back to Benkelman, where they resided till the day of his death, May 29, 1917, aged 35 years, 9 months and 12 days leaving a widow and five children to mourn his death. Friday 8 June 1917

Mrs. McDonald Dies. Mrs. William McDonald died Tuesday, June 12, 1917, at the General hospital, where she had been taken a few days before for treatment. Frances Fleming was born in McCook, October 9, 1886, and has lived here all her life. She was married to William D. McDonald, April 24, 1907, to which union four children were born: Catherine, Virginia, William Eugene, and Francis Robert, who with the husband, survive her. The bereaved husband and little children have the heartfelt sympathy of the whole community in their deep sorrow. Funeral services were held in St. Patrick’s church, Thursday morning, Rev. A.H. Kunz, O.M.I., officiating, and her body laid to rest in Calvary cemetery. Friday 15 June 1917

Mrs. H.M. Mitchell Dies. Mrs. Henry H. Mitchell, after an illness of several years, became worse about six weeks ago and was confined to her bed, June 28 she suffered another stroke of paralysis from the effects of which she passed from the effects of which she passed away Tuesday, July 3, 1917, and is survived by four sons, three daughters, twenty-eight grandchildren, twelve great-grandchildren, two sisters and five brothers. Emaline Snow, was born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, on June 3, 1841. When but a child her parents moved to Filmore county, Iowa. She was married to Henry H. Mitchell, in 1859 to which twelve children were born, seven of whom survive her. In 1882 they moved to the county, locating on a farm near McCook where her husband died October 1, 1914. She was converted and joined the Methodist church in early girlhood, but later transferred her membership to the Church of Christ. The funeral services were held yesterday afternoon at the country home of her youngest son, Nicholas Mitchell, Rev. H.C. Seidel, pastor of the Methodist church here, officiating, the ladies of his choir furnishing the music. Her remains were laid to rest in Riverview cemetery. The sympathy of all go out to the family in their sorrow. Friday 6 July 1917

Lebanon. From the Advertiser. Martin James Kidder, a bachelor seventy-five years old, was found dead Tuesday, July 31st, in his pasture near where he lived upon a rented farm some 16 miles south and west of Lebanon. It was thought that he had died Monday afternoon and laid until Tuesday evening before he was found. The chances are that the end came from sunstroke or heart failure. Friday 17 July 1917

Obituary. Thomas Jefferson Relph was born in LaFayette county, Indiana, on November 3, 1870. Ten years later he moved with his parents to Red Willow county, Nebraska, where he was reared to manhood. In 1893 he moved to Decatur county, Kansas, where he made his home until two years ago, when he moved to Beaver City, which was his home until his death. He was married to Dora Johnson, on May 18, 1893, and he was the father of nine children. Mr. Relph was taken ill about April last. He spent several months at Rochester, Minn., hoping to regain his health, and receive permanent benefit, but about three weeks ago returned and went to the hospital in Cambridge, Nebraska, where he passed to Eternity on Monday morning July 16, 1917. He is survived by his wife, sons, daughter, one grandchild, his mother, 3 brothers, and 5 sisters. Funeral services ere held at the Methodist church I McCook on Wednesdayt afteroon, July 18, 1917, conducted by the Rev. H.E. Seidel, Music was rendered by members of the church choir. Interment was in Long view cemetery. Communicated. Friday 17 July 1917

Indianola. From The Reporter. Mrs. Amie Teel was born near Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, February 10, 1857 and passed to her reward at Excelsior Springs, Mo., on July 14, 1917. When but a child she moved with her parents to Fulton County, Ill., where she resided until she had reached maturity. On June 18, 1877, she was united in holy wedlock to A.C. Teel, of Galesburg, Ill., and to their union were born two children - Miss Effie, who died in 1902, and Miss Gertrude, who with the husband and his brother and nephew remain to sorrow for her departure from this earth. Mrs. Teel came to Nebraska, with her husband, in 1877, settling first at Cowles, and later, on a homestead six miles north of Indianola. She was a resident of Red Willow county for 33 years. For 12 years she was actively engaged in the millinery business in Indianola and for five years a successful teacher in our public schools. Mrs. Teel resided with her family in Indianola until about five months ago, when they went to Excelsior Springs to reside. The remains were brought to Indianola Sunday and funeral services were conducted from the residence of Frank Teel, on Tuesday afternoon by Rev. Chas. Gearhart, of the Congregational church. Friday 24 July 1917

Mrs. R.J. Traphagan Dies. Mrs. Robert J. Traphagan, of Coleman precinct, died in this city, Monday, July 23, 1917, aged 59 years. The funeral services were held in St. Patrick’s church, Wednesday morning, Father McCullough, O.M.I. Officiating and her body laid to rest in Calvary cemetery. The deceased is survived by her husband and twelve children, six sons and six daughters, and they have the sympathy of the community in their sorrow. Obituary. Clare Melinda Colgan was born in Stark county, Illinois, July 2, 1858 and died at her home in McCook, Nebraska, Monday, July 23, 1917, at 4:45 p.m. She was married to Robert Traphagan December 26, 1877, and to this union were born 13 children 12 of them surviving her, namely Fred Traphagan, George Traphagan, John Traphagan, Mrs. Druscilla Pate, Mrs. Eliza Cain, Robert Traphagan, Edward Traphagan, Mrs. Mary Wenig, Joseph Traphagan, Anna Traphagan, Rose Traphagan, Clara Traphagan; one child having died in infancy. All children being present at the funeral except one daughter, Mrs. Eliza Cain, who was unable to attend. Mr. Traphagan moved his wife and family from Illinois to McCook, Nebraska in 1892, where they have since resided. Friday 27 July 1917

Dr. Peter Boyle Dies. Thursday afternoon, August 2, 1917, Dr. Peter Boyle, died at his home in Denver, aged 91 years. The deceased was the father of Mr. Charles H. Boyle, of this city, and was among the first citizens of McCook, coming to this city in 1883 opened an office and practiced his profession as a dentist for about thirteen years. He moved to Denver in 1896. He was a man of exemplary character, and his memory will be held in the highest esteem by all who knew him. Mr. Boyle has been declining in strength for some time but the end came suddenly. His son, C.H. Boyle, and family, of this city, were present when his spirit passed away. Funeral services were held at his late home in Denver, Sunday afternoon and his body buried by the side of his wife, who preceded him in October, 1916. The bereaved family have the sympathy of their many friends here in their sorrow. Friday 17 August 1917

Dies Suddenly. Mrs. Josephine Jackson died suddenly at 9:20 Wednesday evening, August 15, 1917, of heart trouble at the home of her daughter, Mrs. N.H. Snyder, Mrs. Jackson has been a resident of McCook for many years during which time she has followed the profession of nurse. She has many friends who will mourn her sudden death. The sympathy of the community goes out to the sorrowing family. Friday 17 August 1917

Obituary. At Watertown, Wisconsin, Anna Tilgner was born on January 27, 1873. She moved to Nebraska in 1890, where they settled in Frontier county, and later came to McCook, where she has made her home since. She was married in 1892 to William Unger; and she was the mother of five children of whom two died in early life. As a girl she was confirmed in the Lutheran church of which she was a member the remainder of her life. Mrs. Unger was sick for about nineteen months and was a great sufferer through the whole period. Previous to this, she had been sick for over five years. She died on Monday morning, August 27, 1917, leaving her husband, two sons, one daughter, her father, two brothers, and four sisters. Funeral services were held at the Methodist church on Wednesday afternoon conducted by the Rev. H.C. Seidel. Music was rendered by members of the church choir. Interment was in Longview. Friday 31 August 1917

Dies From Injuries. Sunday evening while bringing the cows home to milk, John Cashen, 14 year old son of Mr. And Mrs. Henry Cashen, of Coleman precinct, was fatally injured, dying from the effects of his injuries Tuesday night at the Co-operative hospital. He and his older brother were driving the cows home when they saw two down in a canyon, some distance away, and the brother told John, who was riding a horse to go and drive them up, and he would take the others on home. When John did not arrive, when he should the brother went to see what was the reason, found him in an unconscious condition near the fence. He summoned his father, they carried him home, and called a doctor, who could find no broken bones. John, when regained consciousness, said that when he tried to drive the animals one, being a bull, became enraged and charged on the horse, striking him in the side, that was all he could remember about it. Monday, Dr. Kay was called and again early Tuesday morning, when John got worse. His condition, then was so serious he was brought to this city for an operation. But he was beyond aid. It is thought that the horse fell upon him as he was injured internally. The sorrow stricken family have the heartfelt sympathy of everyone in their affliction. Funeral services were held this morning at St. Patrick’s church in this city. Friday 9 September 1917

Mrs. J.M. Rugg Called. Mrs. J.M. Rupp died Friday night, August 31, 1917, after a short illness from typhoid fever. She was born May 16, 1867, in Allen Grove, Wisconsin. In 1872 moved to Hastings with her parents, and was married to W.E. Ulmer, May 4, 1886, by which union a son, Ralph E. Ulmer, of California, was born. July 1, 1896, she was married to J.M. Rupp, who with nine children, she leaves to mourn her death. She was an excellent woman a kind mother, faithful wife and good neighbor. She was a member of the Baptist church of this city. Funeral services were held in the Baptist church, Sunday afternoon, Rev. A.L. Zink of the Christian church officiated. The bereaved family have the sincere sympathy of the community in their sorrow. Friday 9 September 1917

Dan Hupp Dies. Dan Hupp one of Lebanon’s most prominent business men, and one of the earliest citizens of that town, died suddenly, of heart failure, Friday evening, August 31, 1917 at his home. He and his son, Ferris had been over to this city and that days in his ear, on which he had some repairing done, and apparently was feeling in his usual health. For many years, Mr. Hupp was one of the prominent men of this county, and will be greatly missed in his town and community at large. Friday 9 September 1917

Boy Accidentally Killed. Roscoe Schoenthal, aged 15 years, son of Mr. And Mrs. D.W. Schoenthal who live two miles north of Indianola was found Thursday afternoon, just back of O.V. Ault’s residence, dead. Mr. Ault has been visiting in the east and Roscoe has been taking care of his stock. Wednesday afternoon he went as usual to Ault’s to milk the cows and had put them in the corral and had just put the milk in the separator when the accident happened. It is thought he saw a rat or some animal near the feed lots and running to get a shot as it tripped and fell and the gun exploded, the charge from the gun entering his face, below the eyes and pierced the brain. Friday 9 September 1917

M.R. Gates Dies. Word was received here last Friday evening that M.R. Gates, formerly of this city, died at his home in Republican City that day. Mr. Gates had been an engineer on this division of the Burlington for many years, running out of this city and several years ago was transferred to the Republican branch where he has been running on the passenger train between there and Oberlin. For some time his health has been failing and death came to relieve him from his earthly suffering. He served in the navy during the civil war. His wife, two sons and one daughter survive him. His body was interred in the cemetery at Republican City, Sunday. The sympathy of everyone here goes out to the sorrowing family. Friday 28 September 1917

Takes Her Own Life. Young Lady in Fit of Despondency Drinks Carbolic Acid. Monday morning, about 9 o’clock, Miss Ella Simmerman, daughter of Mr. And Mrs. G.H. Simmerman, committed suicide at her home, 1010 Second streets West, by swallowing about three ounces of carbolic acid, while effected by an acute state of melancholia. Miss Ella Simmerman, was born in this county, March 8, 1892, and has lived in and near McCook all her life. She was young of quick and generous impulses, very energetic and her sad end was a surprise to her many friends. She is survived by her mother, sister, Mrs. Ella Schinsel, of LeBarg, Wyoming; Mrs. Henry Grover Doyle, Mrs. Fred Traphagen, Mrs. Dora Godfrey, and Mrs. Laura Reisher; two brothers, C.H., and A.R. Simmerman, all of this city, and a half brother, Frank Marsh, of Toulon, Illinois. The sympathy of the community is extended to the bereaved mother and family in their deep sorrow. The funeral services were held at her late home Wednesday afternoon, Rev. H.C. Seidel, officiating, the music was furnished by a ladies quartette and her body interred in Riverview cemetery. Friday 28 September 1917

Death of Mrs. J.C. Stone. Tuesday morning the citizens of McCook were shocked to learn that Mrs. J.C. Stone, had died at the General Hospital about 3 o’clock, where she had been taken on Monday of last week for an operation and care. She had been recovering and was seemingly in a fair way to regain her usual health, when she became very nervous and much excited during the heavy rain and electric storm Monday evening, while in her weakened condition over taxed her strength, and she died in short time after the storm was over. Mrs. Stone and her husband have been in the hotel business in this city for the past several years, and her happy genial way made her many friends, and aided much in the success they have had in their business. Anna Belle McFarland was born in Auglaize county, Ohio, March 11, 1879, and was married to John C. Stone on September 1, 1901, to which union two children were born, both of whom died in infancy. They lived in Spencerville and Lima, Ohio, until 1907, when they came west and moved to McCook in 1910, and have since made this their home. She was a member of the Eastern Star and Pythian Sister lodges of this city. Mrs. Stone was taken ill about September 5, and was taken to the hospital two weeks later, where she died Tuesday morning, September 25, 1917. She is survived by her husband, her parents, Mr. And Mrs. I.W. McFarland of Spencerville, Ohio, three sisters, Mrs. Guy Culp, Mrs. George Reynolds, and Miss Mildred McFarland, and a brother, Smith McFarland. Funeral services were held in the Methodist church Tuesday afternoon Rev. H.C. Seidel, officiating, under the auspices of eureka Chapter, O.E.S. The body, accompanied by Mr. Stone, was taken that afternoon to Spencerville, Ohio, for burial in the family plot in the cemetery there. The sympathy of everyone goes out to the bereft husband. Friday 28 September 1917

Obituary. Josephine Whitaker was born on March 1, 1850, at Frankfort, Kentucky. When a young woman she moved to Indiana with her parents from whence she went to Guide Rock Nebraska in 1882. Two years later she came to McCook which was her home at the time of her death. On March 13, 1866, she was married to John Jackson. She was the mother of five children of whom two died in infancy. In early life she united with the Church of Christ from which she never severed her membership. As one of the early settlers in McCook, Mrs. Jackson was well known and her kindly ministration will be remembered by many. She was a woman of sterling character and devoted to her profession as a nurse. Her wish not to be confined to her bed with a lingering illness was granted on Wednesday evening when she passed to Eternity, within ten minutes after she was taken ill, about 9:20 o’clock August 15, 1917. She is survived by two sons: Thomas R., and Geo. M. Jackson, of Spokane, Washington, one daughter, Mrs. N.H. Snyder, of McCook, eight grandchildren, one brother and one sister. Funeral services were held at the M.E. church on Friday afternoon, August 17, conducted by the Rev. H.C. Seidel with the music by the church choir. Interment was at Riverview. Friday 24 September 1917

Another Old Citizen Called. W.H. Campbell Passes Away Following An Operation. M.H. Campbell died at the Co-operative Hospital early Saturday morning, following an operation performed upon him the day before. He had lived in this city for a number of years, working at his trade as a carpenter. William Homer Campbell was born September 7, 1845, in Syracuse, New York. He came west and located in Lincoln. After he had grown to manhood and later came to McCook, where he has resided ever since. He was married to Miss Frances Wygent, who died in September, 1907. For some time past he has been suffering from an internal ailment, which, it was thought, an operation would remedy and give him relief. The operation was performed Friday morning and he seemingly was recovering, and his death came early the next morning, Saturday, September 29, 1917, was a shock to his many friends. He is survived by but one brother. Funeral services were held Monday afternoon in the M.E. church, Rev. H.C. Seidel, officiating and his remains buried in Riverview cemetery. Friday 5 October 1917

A Long Life Ended. Mrs. Patsy Jackson Over Ninety-three Years Old, Called to Rest. A long, eventful, and useful life came to the end of its existence on earth when the spirit of Mrs. Patsy Jackson was wafted to that of one beyond the grave Sunday, October 14, 1917. Her life was full of stirring incidents which developed in her a most noble character that had for its foundation a long line of sturdy ancestors, whose high ideals in life, devotion and loyalty to their homes and country were a source of great satisfaction and justifiable pride to Mrs. Jackson, and that she had at all times in affluence and adversities had maintained the high standard of her forebears, made her declining years most happy ones, and her wise counsel, exemplary life and strong character makes her children rise up and call her blessed, and everyone who knew her esteem her friendship; admire her courage, enjoy and profit by her wisdom. She was intensely loyal to her country and detested above all things a traitor. She kept in touch, up to the last, with all public questions and had decided views in all matters of national importance and opinion of public officials, and her views on all matters were interesting, entertaining and instructive. She wrote well, but could not be induced to write her biography. Mrs. Patsy Jackson was the daughter of Charles and Henrietta Adair Buford, and born June 11, 1824, at Frankford, Kentucky, in the Governor’s mansion, her grandfather, John Adair, being governor of the state at that time. She was married in 1846 to James S. Jackson in Georgetown, Kentucky. They moved to Greensburg, and after two years to Hopkinsville, Kentucky. Seven children were born to them, three of whom died in infancy, one daughter, Mrs. Juliet Walker, died here about two years ago, and is survived by two sons and one daughter. David S. Jackson of Washington, D.C., who has lived here with his mother the past two years, and Mrs. A. Galusha, of this city. Mrs. Jackson’s great-grandfather, McDowell, was a member of the house of burgesses of Virginia, preceding and during the revolutionary war. He was a personal and intimate friend of Washington and Jefferson, and closely associated with them during our country’s struggle for liberty. Her grandfather Abraham Buford was a colonel in the Revolutionary war, and her grandfather, John Adair also served in this war, and was a major general in the war of 1812. He was afterwards governor of Kentucky and United States Senator from that state. Her father, Charles Buford moved to Illinois in 1852 from Kentucky and lived there until his death. Her husband was elected to congress from his district in Kentucky in 1860. He resigned in June 1861, and went to Kentucky where he raised the 3rd Ky. Cav. U.S. Vols, and was promoted to Brig. General U.S. Vols, in July 1862. He was killed in the Battle of Perryville, Kentucky, October 8, 1862, while command the division. Her eldest son, David S. Jackson, enlisted in the 4th Ky Cav. U.S. Vol. In 1864, was promoted to Lieutenant and served until the close of the war. Her other son, James B. Jackson, is a graduate of West Point, has been in active service on the frontier and was promoted to colonel, he is now on the retired list, but anxious to serve in the present war. Mrs. Jackson moved to Madison, Indiana in 1868. In 1876 she moved to a farm near Lincoln, Nebraska, and at different times lived in Lincoln, Loup City, Red Cloud, coming to McCook in April 1911, where she made her home until her death. Funeral services were held at her late home, 601 Main Avenue, Tuesday morning at 10 o’clock. Rev. H.J. Johnson, rector of St. Alban’s Episcopal church, officiating. A quartette consisting of Mrs. F.L. Wolfe, and Miss Martha Suess, and Messrs. H.C. Clapp and C.F. Heber, sang the hymns, “Rock of Ages” and “Lead Kindley Light”. Her body was laid to rest in Longview cemetery beside that of her daughter, Mrs. Juliet Walker. The pallbearers were: Messrs. F. A. Pennell, L.W. McConnell, C.W. Barnes, J.E. Kelley, Harold Sutton and Virgil Barbazette. The sympathy of the community goes out to the sorrowing children. Friday 19 October 1917

Buried Babe. The infant baby girl born to Mr. And Mrs. Ed. Wagner, who live 12 miles north of town, Monday morning at the McCook General hospital, was buried that day. The parents have the sincere sympathy of all who know them in their sorrow. Friday 26 October 1917

Marion. From The Enterprise. The seven weeks old daughter of Mr. And Mrs. Thos. Cox was found dead by its parents sometime during the night of Sunday October 28. We are unable to learn the particulars. Funeral services were held at the George Fisher home, northeast of Danbury at 2 o’clock, Tuesday, conducted by Rev. Fred Richards of Beaver City. The grief stricken parents have the sympathy of all in their bereavement. Friday 9 November 1917

Mrs. Pearl Thompson, daughter of Mrs. W. Kugler and sister of Mrs. R.A. Reimer, and who formerly lived north of Culbertson passed to rest, October 14, 1917. Nora May Kugler was born in Dallas county, Iowa, on Dec. 31, 1873. She was married to Pearl Thompson on December 31, 1902. She leaves to mourn her death two sisters, four brothers, mother, her husband and four children, besides a host of friends. Friday 8 November 1917

Mrs. Fred Wilson Dies. After an illness of about a month Mrs. Fred Wilson died Saturday morning, November, at the home of her husband’s parents, Mr. And Mrs. B.F. Wilson, in this city. Bessie Breedon was born at Max, Nebraska, January 8, 1894. She graduated from the public schools in Stratton. She was united in marriage to Mr. Fred Wilson on January 1, 1916. They moved to a farm seven miles north of Culbertson. She is survived by her husband, a son, one month old, mother, a brother and three sisters. The deceased was highly esteemed by all who knew her, as was attested by the large number of people who attend her funeral from Max, where she was born and raised, and from Stratton, where she attended school several years, and the many neighbors from her late home north of Culbertson. Funeral services were held in the Methodist church Sunday afternoon, Rev. Seidel officiating and her remains buried in Longview cemetery. The grief-stricken husband and family have the heartfelt sympathy of all in their sorrow. Friday 19 November 1917

Mrs. Alice Wade Dies. Mrs. Alice Wade, who for many years has lived near Danbury, was brought to the McCook General hospital Tuesday suffering from the effects of swallowing concentrated lye. Everything possible was done to save her life and ease her suffering but death relieved her from pain Wednesday morning. The deceased was born March 11, 1868, in Wisconsin. She was divorced from her husband about six years ago, and has heroically supported her seven children with the help they could give her, the eldest being 17 and the youngest 8 years of age. She has always had the respect of those in that community, and the heartfelt sympathy go out to the bereaved children. Her remains were taken to Pade’s undertaking rooms, prepared for burial and Wednesday evening were taken to Danbury, where funeral services were held yesterday afternoon and interred in the cemetery at that place. Friday 23 November 1917

Obituary. Little Velva M. Coleman, daughter of Frank and Flora Coleman, was born in Frontier county on August 17, 1908. About four months ago she was taken ill and about three weeks ago her condition became serious. She passed from earth to heaven on Thursday, December 20, 1917, a little over nine years of age. She leaves her parents, two brothers and one sister. The funeral services were held on Saturday afternoon, December 22, 1917, from the home of her parents in East McCook conducted by the Rev. H.C. Seidel. Several of the ladies of the church sang a number of hymns. Interment was in the Riverview cemetery. Friday 28 December 1917

John W. Deveny Dies. John W. Deveny, of Indianola, who has been ill for some time, died at his home in Indianola, on Christmas day. The decease was one of the early settlers in Missouri Ridge precinct, and by his industry accumulated much of the world’s goods. His health failing he turned his big, well-equipped farm over to his sons, to manage and last summer bought a residence in Indianola and moved in to that town, where he could receive medical treatment and rest the balance of his days. John Deveny, was a kind, indulgent husband and father, a good neighbor, an honest, upright man, and had many warm friends everywhere he was known. Funeral services were held at his late home, Rev. C.D. Gearhart, of the Congregational church, officiating yesterday afternoon. The sympathy of everyone is extended to the sorrowing family. Friday 28 December 1917

Mrs. John McAdams Dies. Sunday afternoon, December 23, 1917, at 3 o’clock another of the old residents of McCook passed away when Mrs. John McAdams was called to her eternal rest. Her last illness was of but short duration, taken seriously ill Saturday she died the following day. Rose Leonard was born in the county Farmanagh, Ireland, in 1831. She came to the United States in 1852 and was married to John W. McAdams at Dixon, Illinois, in 1859. Mr. McAdams died in this city June 15, 1915. To this union there were nine children, five of whom survive; James McAdams and Mrs. Mary Cain of this city, John W. McAdams and Mrs. C.E. Dougherty, of Sedalia Missouri, and Miss Elizabeth McAdams, of Los Angeles, California, all of whom except Miss McAdams were present at the funeral. She moved to this city with her family in 1885 and resided here ever since. She was a faithful wife and indulgent mother. The family have the sympathy of all in their sorrow. Funeral services were held in St. Patrick’s R.C. church, Wednesday morning, December 26, 1917, Father A.H. Kunz, O.M.I. Officiating and her body laid to rest in Calvary cemetery. Friday 28 December 1917